Presentation Title

Development of Aqueous pH-Neutral Flow Batteries

Faculty Mentor

John Christopher Bachman

Start Date

23-11-2019 8:00 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 8:45 AM

Location

167

Session

poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

engineering_computer_science

Abstract

With the growth of renewable energy sources, the need for energy storage becomes significant to buffer their fluctuating output. Aqueous pH-neutral flow batteries (APNFBs) provide an inexpensive, minimally toxic, large scale solution to provide energy storage with controllable output.

Unlike non-aqueous flow batteries, APNFBs use water as its dissolving agent making them less expensive, less toxic, and less damaging to the environment. The use of water over organic solvents provides a safe, cost effective solution in manufacturing aqueous pH-neutral flow batteries.

To this end, a systematic study was conducted to find catholyte and anolyte materials suitable for APNFBs based on their redox potentials, solubility, ease of synthesis, and reversibility.

Several compounds were tested at varying concentrations and scan rates using cyclic voltammetry (CV) to determine the redox potential and reversibility. (Ferrocenylmethyl)trimethylammonium chloride (FcNCl) was the primary focus for a catholyte compound. Anolyte compounds included iron chloride (II)/(III) with sodium tribasic citrate, 3,4-diaminobenzoic acid, and 9,10-anthraquinone-2,7-disulfonic diammonium salt (AQDS(NH4)2). These compounds were solvated in a solution of 1 mol NaCl and water to mimic their environment when used in a flow battery.

The results of FcNCl proved it to be a promising catholyte as CV results were shown to have high redox potential and good reversibility at a redox of about 0.43 mV. The results of 3,4-diaminobenzoic acid showed the electrochemistry was stable at low redox potential of about -0.3 mV but there are visual changes in the compound over time. The results of Fe(II)Cl/Fe(III)Cl + Sodium Tribasic Citrate show that the redox potential changes by varying the concentration of the citrate ligand and can go up to -0.3 mV. The results of AQDS(NH4)2 show a promising negative redox potential at -0.5 mV.

As several compounds showed promise, future studies will include incorporating materials into full flow battery tests.

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Nov 23rd, 8:00 AM Nov 23rd, 8:45 AM

Development of Aqueous pH-Neutral Flow Batteries

167

With the growth of renewable energy sources, the need for energy storage becomes significant to buffer their fluctuating output. Aqueous pH-neutral flow batteries (APNFBs) provide an inexpensive, minimally toxic, large scale solution to provide energy storage with controllable output.

Unlike non-aqueous flow batteries, APNFBs use water as its dissolving agent making them less expensive, less toxic, and less damaging to the environment. The use of water over organic solvents provides a safe, cost effective solution in manufacturing aqueous pH-neutral flow batteries.

To this end, a systematic study was conducted to find catholyte and anolyte materials suitable for APNFBs based on their redox potentials, solubility, ease of synthesis, and reversibility.

Several compounds were tested at varying concentrations and scan rates using cyclic voltammetry (CV) to determine the redox potential and reversibility. (Ferrocenylmethyl)trimethylammonium chloride (FcNCl) was the primary focus for a catholyte compound. Anolyte compounds included iron chloride (II)/(III) with sodium tribasic citrate, 3,4-diaminobenzoic acid, and 9,10-anthraquinone-2,7-disulfonic diammonium salt (AQDS(NH4)2). These compounds were solvated in a solution of 1 mol NaCl and water to mimic their environment when used in a flow battery.

The results of FcNCl proved it to be a promising catholyte as CV results were shown to have high redox potential and good reversibility at a redox of about 0.43 mV. The results of 3,4-diaminobenzoic acid showed the electrochemistry was stable at low redox potential of about -0.3 mV but there are visual changes in the compound over time. The results of Fe(II)Cl/Fe(III)Cl + Sodium Tribasic Citrate show that the redox potential changes by varying the concentration of the citrate ligand and can go up to -0.3 mV. The results of AQDS(NH4)2 show a promising negative redox potential at -0.5 mV.

As several compounds showed promise, future studies will include incorporating materials into full flow battery tests.