Presentation Title

Repetitive behavior validation in autistic-like mouse models

Faculty Mentor

Bryce Ryan

Start Date

23-11-2019 8:00 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 8:45 AM

Location

175

Session

poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

health_nutrition_clinical_science

Abstract

Repetitive Behavior Validation in Mouse Models of Autism

Marlena Ramanis, Aditi Bhatnagar, Dr. Bryce C. Ryan

The C58/J inbred mouse strain has characteristic repetitive behaviors and social anxiety that make them a potential animal model for autism. A previous serotonin assay study conducted in our lab indicated that intraperitoneal injections suppressed repetitive behaviors in this strain's control group, which clouded results for serotonin effectiveness. In this study, further testing was done to determine explicitly whether injection triggered the loss of these behaviors. C57BL/6J and C58/J mice were given a blank intraperitoneal injection that contained no solution with control mice receiving no injection. Post injection, the mice were placed in an enclosure simulating their living conditions and video recorded for 20 minutes. The videos were then scored for the frequency and duration of several repetitive behaviors using Noldus The Observer program. Behaviors included jumping, circling, scrabbling, and others. Data were compiled and analyzed for the effects of injection and strain. Results showed that there was no difference in repetitive behaviors in the C58 strain for injection and non-injection, but the C58 control group showed elevated repetitive behaviors when compared to the C57 control group. It was concluded that injection had no effect on behavior and the lack of repetitive behaviors in the previous study are unexplained. A possible explanation could be the different lighting conditions since this study had brighter lighting than previous studies. Lighting may influence mouse circadian rhythms which may cause differences in behavior. Future work will include testing the involvement of the serotonin and dopamine systems on social anxiety and repetitive behaviors in the C58 mice as well as hormone systems like oxytocin and vasopressin.

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Nov 23rd, 8:00 AM Nov 23rd, 8:45 AM

Repetitive behavior validation in autistic-like mouse models

175

Repetitive Behavior Validation in Mouse Models of Autism

Marlena Ramanis, Aditi Bhatnagar, Dr. Bryce C. Ryan

The C58/J inbred mouse strain has characteristic repetitive behaviors and social anxiety that make them a potential animal model for autism. A previous serotonin assay study conducted in our lab indicated that intraperitoneal injections suppressed repetitive behaviors in this strain's control group, which clouded results for serotonin effectiveness. In this study, further testing was done to determine explicitly whether injection triggered the loss of these behaviors. C57BL/6J and C58/J mice were given a blank intraperitoneal injection that contained no solution with control mice receiving no injection. Post injection, the mice were placed in an enclosure simulating their living conditions and video recorded for 20 minutes. The videos were then scored for the frequency and duration of several repetitive behaviors using Noldus The Observer program. Behaviors included jumping, circling, scrabbling, and others. Data were compiled and analyzed for the effects of injection and strain. Results showed that there was no difference in repetitive behaviors in the C58 strain for injection and non-injection, but the C58 control group showed elevated repetitive behaviors when compared to the C57 control group. It was concluded that injection had no effect on behavior and the lack of repetitive behaviors in the previous study are unexplained. A possible explanation could be the different lighting conditions since this study had brighter lighting than previous studies. Lighting may influence mouse circadian rhythms which may cause differences in behavior. Future work will include testing the involvement of the serotonin and dopamine systems on social anxiety and repetitive behaviors in the C58 mice as well as hormone systems like oxytocin and vasopressin.