Presentation Title

Does Audio Feedback Impact the Postural Stability in Response to Virtual Visual Stimuli?

Faculty Mentor

Tumay Tunur

Start Date

23-11-2019 8:00 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 8:45 AM

Location

179

Session

poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

health_nutrition_clinical_science

Abstract

Background: The central nervous system (CNS) constantly processes sensory input from our surroundings in order to maintain a stable posture in response to the changes in the environment. The environment that the CNS perceives and interacts with can be manipulated in virtual reality (VR). Specifically, VR roller coaster simulations can provide an immersive experience that can influence CNS control of postural stability. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects that the audio feature of a VR roller coaster simulation has on postural stability. Methods: 61 healthy college students participated in this study. All participants underwent three 30-second trials, in a randomized order, while standing on top of a force platform: eyes open quiet stance, eyes closed quiet stance, and VR roller coaster simulation. The track consisted of a series of turns to the left and right, while going up and down. Depending on the randomly assigned groups, participants experienced the VR condition either with audio or no audio. Postural sway range, peak velocity, and mean velocity for both anteroposterior and mediolateral sway were calculated. Matching 1-way ANOVA tests were run to compare the average mediolateral and anteroposterior postural sway across all conditions. An unpaired t-test was used to compare the VR trials with and without audio. Results: Our findings thus far show there is a significant difference between all trials with audio. All conditions are statistically different from each other. Data collection for the no audio group will be completed by the first week of November, 2019. Conclusions: The VR roller coaster simulation causes postural instability in AP and ML directions. The effect of having a more immersive experience with the audio feedback present on postural stability will be discussed. Key Words: Virtual reality, proprioception, motor control, central nervous system, posture, balance

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Nov 23rd, 8:00 AM Nov 23rd, 8:45 AM

Does Audio Feedback Impact the Postural Stability in Response to Virtual Visual Stimuli?

179

Background: The central nervous system (CNS) constantly processes sensory input from our surroundings in order to maintain a stable posture in response to the changes in the environment. The environment that the CNS perceives and interacts with can be manipulated in virtual reality (VR). Specifically, VR roller coaster simulations can provide an immersive experience that can influence CNS control of postural stability. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects that the audio feature of a VR roller coaster simulation has on postural stability. Methods: 61 healthy college students participated in this study. All participants underwent three 30-second trials, in a randomized order, while standing on top of a force platform: eyes open quiet stance, eyes closed quiet stance, and VR roller coaster simulation. The track consisted of a series of turns to the left and right, while going up and down. Depending on the randomly assigned groups, participants experienced the VR condition either with audio or no audio. Postural sway range, peak velocity, and mean velocity for both anteroposterior and mediolateral sway were calculated. Matching 1-way ANOVA tests were run to compare the average mediolateral and anteroposterior postural sway across all conditions. An unpaired t-test was used to compare the VR trials with and without audio. Results: Our findings thus far show there is a significant difference between all trials with audio. All conditions are statistically different from each other. Data collection for the no audio group will be completed by the first week of November, 2019. Conclusions: The VR roller coaster simulation causes postural instability in AP and ML directions. The effect of having a more immersive experience with the audio feedback present on postural stability will be discussed. Key Words: Virtual reality, proprioception, motor control, central nervous system, posture, balance