Presentation Title

Manual dexterity measurements demonstrate transfer of learning from dominant to non-dominant hands

Faculty Mentor

Deanna Asakawa

Start Date

23-11-2019 8:00 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 8:45 AM

Location

183

Session

poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

health_nutrition_clinical_science

Abstract

The purpose was to analyze motor performance of an individual's dominant and non-dominant hands using measures of manual dexterity. Motor performance of 18 healthy college-aged participants (7 males, 11 females) were tested and characterized using 3 different testing procedures that measured motor dexterity of the subjects’ hands. First, maximum pinch strength was tested using an Exacta Hydraulic Pinch Gauge, indicating each of the subjects’ maximum ability to pinch between their index finger and thumb of their dominant hand. Second, participants performed a Grooved Pegboard Test which analyzed complex visual-motor coordination based on the amount of time in seconds to complete the test in which small pegs are placed into keyed slots. Lastly, participants performed a Minnesota Manual Dexterity Test which measured time in seconds to complete gross arm and hand movements to move circular disks with one hand from one testing board to another for each of the participants. Tests were performed by the participants while standing. The results of the study showed no significant correlation between the participants’ maximum pinch strengths and Minnesota Manual Dexterity Test completion times of the dominant hand. However, the findings did demonstrate a significant correlation (p=0.0005, r = 0.734) between the Grooved Pegboard Test completion times, when comparing the dominant and non-dominant hand. Completion time on the Grooved Pegboard Test averaged 62.1± 9.6 seconds on the dominant hands and 70.8±17.2 seconds on the non-dominant hands. We can conclude that a significant relationship exists between dominant and non-dominant hand manual dexterity. This may be as a result of the dominant hand being frequently utilized in activities of daily living and transfer of motor learning from dominant to non-dominant hand may have occurred. Furthermore, pinch strength was not correlated to manual dexterity and motor performance of the dominant and non-dominant hand.

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Nov 23rd, 8:00 AM Nov 23rd, 8:45 AM

Manual dexterity measurements demonstrate transfer of learning from dominant to non-dominant hands

183

The purpose was to analyze motor performance of an individual's dominant and non-dominant hands using measures of manual dexterity. Motor performance of 18 healthy college-aged participants (7 males, 11 females) were tested and characterized using 3 different testing procedures that measured motor dexterity of the subjects’ hands. First, maximum pinch strength was tested using an Exacta Hydraulic Pinch Gauge, indicating each of the subjects’ maximum ability to pinch between their index finger and thumb of their dominant hand. Second, participants performed a Grooved Pegboard Test which analyzed complex visual-motor coordination based on the amount of time in seconds to complete the test in which small pegs are placed into keyed slots. Lastly, participants performed a Minnesota Manual Dexterity Test which measured time in seconds to complete gross arm and hand movements to move circular disks with one hand from one testing board to another for each of the participants. Tests were performed by the participants while standing. The results of the study showed no significant correlation between the participants’ maximum pinch strengths and Minnesota Manual Dexterity Test completion times of the dominant hand. However, the findings did demonstrate a significant correlation (p=0.0005, r = 0.734) between the Grooved Pegboard Test completion times, when comparing the dominant and non-dominant hand. Completion time on the Grooved Pegboard Test averaged 62.1± 9.6 seconds on the dominant hands and 70.8±17.2 seconds on the non-dominant hands. We can conclude that a significant relationship exists between dominant and non-dominant hand manual dexterity. This may be as a result of the dominant hand being frequently utilized in activities of daily living and transfer of motor learning from dominant to non-dominant hand may have occurred. Furthermore, pinch strength was not correlated to manual dexterity and motor performance of the dominant and non-dominant hand.