Presentation Title

The Self-Reference Effect and the Formation of True and False Memories

Faculty Mentor

Dustin Calvillo

Start Date

23-11-2019 8:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 9:30 AM

Location

20

Session

poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

The self-reference effect occurs when relating information to oneself leads to improved memory for that information. The self-reference effect on true memories is well established; however, less is known about its effect on the creation of false memories. The present study examined the role of the self-reference effect on the recognition of true and false memories. Eighty-four participants were presented with 12 Deese-Roediger-McDermott word lists. Participants were instructed to relate some of the words to themselves (self-reference), to relate some of the words to Donald Trump (other-reference), and to rate the pleasantness of some of the words. Participants had significantly greater false recognition of critical lures in the self-reference condition compared to the other-reference condition. Ceiling effects may have masked differences in true memories. These results are consistent with the idea that self-referencing increases spreading activation or gist traces, which leads to increased false memory of critical lures.

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Nov 23rd, 8:45 AM Nov 23rd, 9:30 AM

The Self-Reference Effect and the Formation of True and False Memories

20

The self-reference effect occurs when relating information to oneself leads to improved memory for that information. The self-reference effect on true memories is well established; however, less is known about its effect on the creation of false memories. The present study examined the role of the self-reference effect on the recognition of true and false memories. Eighty-four participants were presented with 12 Deese-Roediger-McDermott word lists. Participants were instructed to relate some of the words to themselves (self-reference), to relate some of the words to Donald Trump (other-reference), and to rate the pleasantness of some of the words. Participants had significantly greater false recognition of critical lures in the self-reference condition compared to the other-reference condition. Ceiling effects may have masked differences in true memories. These results are consistent with the idea that self-referencing increases spreading activation or gist traces, which leads to increased false memory of critical lures.