Presentation Title

Direct Detection of WIMP Dark Matter with Ultra-Pure Xenon in LUX-ZEPLIN

Faculty Mentor

Daniel Akerib

Start Date

23-11-2019 8:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 9:30 AM

Location

228

Session

poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

physical_mathematical_sciences

Abstract

Researchers found that visible matter alone is not enough to account for the world we see today. Galaxy formation and gravitational models require an invisible matter called dark matter. Now, the LZ (LUX-ZEPLIN) team is trying to detect WIMPs (Weakly Interacting Massive Particles), one of the leading hypothetical candidates of dark matter. LZ is building a detector that will contain seven tons of ultra-pure liquid xenon which allows us to detect these particles. WIMPs will be detected from the light produced by their occasional collisions with the xenon nuclei. To obtain this ultra-pure xenon, our lab is removing trace radioactive krypton from xenon gas. My poster will describe the overall experiment, including my specific contributions to detecting xenon as it flows through the columns during my summer internship.

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Nov 23rd, 8:45 AM Nov 23rd, 9:30 AM

Direct Detection of WIMP Dark Matter with Ultra-Pure Xenon in LUX-ZEPLIN

228

Researchers found that visible matter alone is not enough to account for the world we see today. Galaxy formation and gravitational models require an invisible matter called dark matter. Now, the LZ (LUX-ZEPLIN) team is trying to detect WIMPs (Weakly Interacting Massive Particles), one of the leading hypothetical candidates of dark matter. LZ is building a detector that will contain seven tons of ultra-pure liquid xenon which allows us to detect these particles. WIMPs will be detected from the light produced by their occasional collisions with the xenon nuclei. To obtain this ultra-pure xenon, our lab is removing trace radioactive krypton from xenon gas. My poster will describe the overall experiment, including my specific contributions to detecting xenon as it flows through the columns during my summer internship.