Presentation Title

Individual Differences in Visual, Auditory, and Multisensory Perception

Faculty Mentor

Aleksandra Sherman

Start Date

23-11-2019 8:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 9:30 AM

Location

4

Session

poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Prior research indicates that susceptibility to multisensory illusions varies among individuals. This present study examines the rate of illusory percepts for two multisensory illusions, the McGurk Effect and the Sound-Induced Flash Illusion (SIF). The McGurk Effect occurs when audio of one syllable paired with a visual of another syllable causes the perception of a third syllable. SIF occurs when the presentation of two auditory stimuli (beeps) causes one visual stimulus (flash) to be perceived as two. 26 undergraduates from Occidental College participated in a two-session study. For the McGurk Effect trials, participants were presented with a video of a person speaking and were asked to respond with the perceived syllable (Ba, Ga, Da, or Tha). Similarly, for the SIF trials, participants were presented with a series of flashes and beeps and were asked to respond with the perceived number of flashes (0, 1, or 2). Observed data included both behavioral data and neural data measured using an electroencephalogram (EEG). Our results depicted significant variability in the perception of both illusion such that there was a range of perception from participants experiencing the illusion .02% to 96% of the time for McGurk and 6% to 99.8% of the time for SIF. Each individual’s experience varied from trial to trial. Through computed Event-Related Potentials (ERPs) for SIF, we also found significant early differences between the neural activity across the conditions. We focused on the illusion condition, subtracting the neural activity of trials where the illusion was perceived by that of trials where it was not perceived, leaving only the response to the illusory second flash. There were clear neural differences between the more susceptible participants (See group) vs. less susceptible participants (NoSee group) despite both groups seeing the illusory percept, suggesting a link between neural response and susceptibility.

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Nov 23rd, 8:45 AM Nov 23rd, 9:30 AM

Individual Differences in Visual, Auditory, and Multisensory Perception

4

Prior research indicates that susceptibility to multisensory illusions varies among individuals. This present study examines the rate of illusory percepts for two multisensory illusions, the McGurk Effect and the Sound-Induced Flash Illusion (SIF). The McGurk Effect occurs when audio of one syllable paired with a visual of another syllable causes the perception of a third syllable. SIF occurs when the presentation of two auditory stimuli (beeps) causes one visual stimulus (flash) to be perceived as two. 26 undergraduates from Occidental College participated in a two-session study. For the McGurk Effect trials, participants were presented with a video of a person speaking and were asked to respond with the perceived syllable (Ba, Ga, Da, or Tha). Similarly, for the SIF trials, participants were presented with a series of flashes and beeps and were asked to respond with the perceived number of flashes (0, 1, or 2). Observed data included both behavioral data and neural data measured using an electroencephalogram (EEG). Our results depicted significant variability in the perception of both illusion such that there was a range of perception from participants experiencing the illusion .02% to 96% of the time for McGurk and 6% to 99.8% of the time for SIF. Each individual’s experience varied from trial to trial. Through computed Event-Related Potentials (ERPs) for SIF, we also found significant early differences between the neural activity across the conditions. We focused on the illusion condition, subtracting the neural activity of trials where the illusion was perceived by that of trials where it was not perceived, leaving only the response to the illusory second flash. There were clear neural differences between the more susceptible participants (See group) vs. less susceptible participants (NoSee group) despite both groups seeing the illusory percept, suggesting a link between neural response and susceptibility.