Presentation Title

Civilian Attitudes towards Police Contacts

Faculty Mentor

Nayan G. Ramirez

Start Date

23-11-2019 8:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 9:30 AM

Location

40

Session

poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

In this study, we explore differences in civilian attitudes towards police contacts. Grounded in procedural justice theory, we analyze whether the quality of civilian-police interactions matters more than the outcome of the contacts to civilians. Additionally, we examine whether racial/ethnic match between civilians and the police officer(s) affects the likelihood of a positive civilian assessment of each police interaction. To address these research questions, we use data from the 2015 Police-Public Contact Survey (PPCS), which is a nationally representative sample of residents age 16 or older who answered a supplement to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) about police contacts over the past 12 months. Specifically, using regression analyses, we examine whether a racial/ethnic match between civilians and the police officer(s) affect civilians’ assessments of effectiveness, fairness, and compliance.

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Nov 23rd, 8:45 AM Nov 23rd, 9:30 AM

Civilian Attitudes towards Police Contacts

40

In this study, we explore differences in civilian attitudes towards police contacts. Grounded in procedural justice theory, we analyze whether the quality of civilian-police interactions matters more than the outcome of the contacts to civilians. Additionally, we examine whether racial/ethnic match between civilians and the police officer(s) affects the likelihood of a positive civilian assessment of each police interaction. To address these research questions, we use data from the 2015 Police-Public Contact Survey (PPCS), which is a nationally representative sample of residents age 16 or older who answered a supplement to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) about police contacts over the past 12 months. Specifically, using regression analyses, we examine whether a racial/ethnic match between civilians and the police officer(s) affect civilians’ assessments of effectiveness, fairness, and compliance.