Presentation Title

Sports Participation and Visual Field Dependence

Faculty Mentor

Chela Willey

Start Date

23-11-2019 8:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 9:30 AM

Location

8

Session

poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Visual field dependence refers to the extent to which individuals rely on visual cues for navigation or interaction with the environment. In the presence of inaccurate visual cues, use of somatosensory or vestibular inputs may be more fitting. Individuals with increased visual dependence are more likely to experience vertigo due to their overreliance on visual information, and can have difficulty adapting to conflicting sensory information. Previous literature demonstrates that people who play sports are less likely to be visually dependent than those who do not play sports. Additionally, research shows that those who play sports requiring a strong visual skill-set rely more on visual cues than athletes that engage in less visually dependent sports. The purpose of this study was to examine how participation in sports is associated with the utilization of visual information and bodily kinesthetics in college students. We categorized various activities by the amount of visual training they demanded and compared students within these categorizations. We used the rod and frame in a virtual reality environment to measure the degree to which participants relied on visual context over other sensory cues to provide an estimate of true vertical while standing or supine. Estimates more biased towards the tilt of the room indicate greater visual field dependence. Our data suggested that participants who engaged in visually oriented sports (e.g. ball-sports, dance) had smaller RFT biases than those who did not. Participants who engaged in non-visual activities (e.g. yoga, gymnastics) also had smaller RFT biases than those who did not. However, when vestibular cues did not aid in the RFT (supine condition), people who engaged in visually oriented activities had smaller biases over all groups. Our results can prompt future research on global versus local visual training, its effect on rod and frame biases, and implications for sports training.

Keywords: visual field dependence, athletics, subjective vertical

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Nov 23rd, 8:45 AM Nov 23rd, 9:30 AM

Sports Participation and Visual Field Dependence

8

Visual field dependence refers to the extent to which individuals rely on visual cues for navigation or interaction with the environment. In the presence of inaccurate visual cues, use of somatosensory or vestibular inputs may be more fitting. Individuals with increased visual dependence are more likely to experience vertigo due to their overreliance on visual information, and can have difficulty adapting to conflicting sensory information. Previous literature demonstrates that people who play sports are less likely to be visually dependent than those who do not play sports. Additionally, research shows that those who play sports requiring a strong visual skill-set rely more on visual cues than athletes that engage in less visually dependent sports. The purpose of this study was to examine how participation in sports is associated with the utilization of visual information and bodily kinesthetics in college students. We categorized various activities by the amount of visual training they demanded and compared students within these categorizations. We used the rod and frame in a virtual reality environment to measure the degree to which participants relied on visual context over other sensory cues to provide an estimate of true vertical while standing or supine. Estimates more biased towards the tilt of the room indicate greater visual field dependence. Our data suggested that participants who engaged in visually oriented sports (e.g. ball-sports, dance) had smaller RFT biases than those who did not. Participants who engaged in non-visual activities (e.g. yoga, gymnastics) also had smaller RFT biases than those who did not. However, when vestibular cues did not aid in the RFT (supine condition), people who engaged in visually oriented activities had smaller biases over all groups. Our results can prompt future research on global versus local visual training, its effect on rod and frame biases, and implications for sports training.

Keywords: visual field dependence, athletics, subjective vertical