Presentation Title

Analyzing Host-Microbe Relationships in Experimentally Evolved Drosophila melanogaster Populations

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Parvin Shahrestani

Start Date

23-11-2019 8:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 9:30 AM

Location

84

Session

poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

The microbiome, or community of microbes, found within an organism affects its fitness, influencing traits such as development, immune defense, and lifespan. We studied how experimental evolution for longevity divergence in Drosophila melanogaster populations affects the associated microbiome. Moreover, we tested how flies from short- and long-lived populations are affected by manipulations to the microbiome. Quantitative analysis of bacterial abundance and composition was done by homogenizing whole fly bodies and plating the homogenates on mMRS agar. From this we found that the associated microbiome of populations that have been evolved for prolonged lifespan largely consisted of bacteria from the phylum Proteobacteria. In contrast, the associated microbiome of populations evolved to be shorter-lived were dominated by bacteria from the phylum Firmicutes. To manipulate the microbiome of short- and long- lived flies, axenic flies were created by dechorionating D. melanogaster eggs ~18 hours after egg deposition. These eggs were subsequently inoculated with commensal bacterial species and abundance was surveyed. Preliminary results show that long-lived flies were more extensively colonized when inoculated with Proteobacteria. Short lived populations showed a more even colonization of microbes from both phyla. Continued experimentation is necessary to further elucidate the interactions between the Drosophila melanogaster microbiome and longevity.

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Nov 23rd, 8:45 AM Nov 23rd, 9:30 AM

Analyzing Host-Microbe Relationships in Experimentally Evolved Drosophila melanogaster Populations

84

The microbiome, or community of microbes, found within an organism affects its fitness, influencing traits such as development, immune defense, and lifespan. We studied how experimental evolution for longevity divergence in Drosophila melanogaster populations affects the associated microbiome. Moreover, we tested how flies from short- and long-lived populations are affected by manipulations to the microbiome. Quantitative analysis of bacterial abundance and composition was done by homogenizing whole fly bodies and plating the homogenates on mMRS agar. From this we found that the associated microbiome of populations that have been evolved for prolonged lifespan largely consisted of bacteria from the phylum Proteobacteria. In contrast, the associated microbiome of populations evolved to be shorter-lived were dominated by bacteria from the phylum Firmicutes. To manipulate the microbiome of short- and long- lived flies, axenic flies were created by dechorionating D. melanogaster eggs ~18 hours after egg deposition. These eggs were subsequently inoculated with commensal bacterial species and abundance was surveyed. Preliminary results show that long-lived flies were more extensively colonized when inoculated with Proteobacteria. Short lived populations showed a more even colonization of microbes from both phyla. Continued experimentation is necessary to further elucidate the interactions between the Drosophila melanogaster microbiome and longevity.