Presentation Title

Effects of avalanches on rodent populations

Presenter Information

Giselle SandovalFollow

Faculty Mentor

Rosemary Smith

Start Date

23-11-2019 8:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 9:30 AM

Location

90

Session

poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Ecologists are interested in studying the factors that affect the abundance of a species. Disturbances, such as avalanches, could affect the populations of small mammals. Live trapping has been a traditional method to study abundances of small mammals; however, it has some downsides. A new, non-invasive method of measuring small mammal abundance was tested in a study last year (2018), and proved to be a good indicator of abundance, but not identification of specific species. This new method is using hair tube traps. This year (2019), these hair tube traps were used to measure the effect of avalanches on small mammal populations. The results showed that avalanches had an effect on abundance at three of the four sites, and that these sites showed a recovery at both the avalanche and non-avalanche sites over the summer.

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Nov 23rd, 8:45 AM Nov 23rd, 9:30 AM

Effects of avalanches on rodent populations

90

Ecologists are interested in studying the factors that affect the abundance of a species. Disturbances, such as avalanches, could affect the populations of small mammals. Live trapping has been a traditional method to study abundances of small mammals; however, it has some downsides. A new, non-invasive method of measuring small mammal abundance was tested in a study last year (2018), and proved to be a good indicator of abundance, but not identification of specific species. This new method is using hair tube traps. This year (2019), these hair tube traps were used to measure the effect of avalanches on small mammal populations. The results showed that avalanches had an effect on abundance at three of the four sites, and that these sites showed a recovery at both the avalanche and non-avalanche sites over the summer.