Presentation Title

The Identification and Analysis of Immune Cells Present in Canine Carcinomas

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Chad Barber

Start Date

23-11-2019 8:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 9:30 AM

Location

102

Session

poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to understand the identities and quantities of immune cells present in canine tumors. Specifically, we are looking into the kinds of cells present via cell surface proteins. Tumors were collected from a local vet clinic and brought back to the lab for dissection and disaggregation of cells. Cell culture was used to grow cells for control cell lines to compare results and to ensure the healthy growth of tumor cells. Cells were stained with various antibodies to determine cell type; then assayed by a flow cytometer to determine identity. Data was analyzed using a software called FlowJo. Flow cytometry data indicated that 42% of cells were lymphocytes and about 44% of cells were macrophages. It can be concluded that macrophages, B, and T cells have been identified in the tumor that was assayed. Understanding what cells are present within the canine carcinomas can help researchers implement new treatment methods that are better tailored to the cell types in the tumor; it may also be possible to give better prognoses for canines based on the cell identities and tumor location. Additionally, veterinary research is attempting to adapt immunotherapies used in humans to use in dogs. We hope that this research can aid any current and future cancer researchers that are furthering the knowledge of immune cells in tumors.

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Nov 23rd, 8:45 AM Nov 23rd, 9:30 AM

The Identification and Analysis of Immune Cells Present in Canine Carcinomas

102

The purpose of this study is to understand the identities and quantities of immune cells present in canine tumors. Specifically, we are looking into the kinds of cells present via cell surface proteins. Tumors were collected from a local vet clinic and brought back to the lab for dissection and disaggregation of cells. Cell culture was used to grow cells for control cell lines to compare results and to ensure the healthy growth of tumor cells. Cells were stained with various antibodies to determine cell type; then assayed by a flow cytometer to determine identity. Data was analyzed using a software called FlowJo. Flow cytometry data indicated that 42% of cells were lymphocytes and about 44% of cells were macrophages. It can be concluded that macrophages, B, and T cells have been identified in the tumor that was assayed. Understanding what cells are present within the canine carcinomas can help researchers implement new treatment methods that are better tailored to the cell types in the tumor; it may also be possible to give better prognoses for canines based on the cell identities and tumor location. Additionally, veterinary research is attempting to adapt immunotherapies used in humans to use in dogs. We hope that this research can aid any current and future cancer researchers that are furthering the knowledge of immune cells in tumors.