Presentation Title

Role of CITED2 in Human Adipogenesis

Faculty Mentor

Yuanxian (Ansel) Zhao

Start Date

23-11-2019 8:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 9:30 AM

Location

104

Session

poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Currently, there is an estimate of 160 million Americans who are considered obese. Studying the molecular mechanisms involved in the development, maintenance, and regulation of adipocytes (fat cells) could provide insights on developing new tools to address obesity. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) are adult stem cells capable of self-renewal and upon receiving appropriate external stimuli, can differentiate into adipocytes through a process called adipogenesis. In this study, we examined the role of CITED2, a Cbp/p300 Interacting Transactivator with Glu/Asp Rich Carboxy-Terminal Domain 2, during human adipogensis using hMSCs as an in vitro cellular model. Our results demonstrated that CITED2 was normally down regulated during adipogenic differentiation of hMSCs. When its expression was further knocked down by siCITED2 introduced into hMSCs during adipogenic initiation, it resulted in significantly accelerated adipocyte maturation and increased differentiation efficiency, indicating that CITED2 normally acts as a negative regulator of human adipogenesis. Correspondingly, the expression of PPAR-gamma and CEBP-alpha, two transcription factors known as master regulators of adipogenesis, was also significantly enhanced by siCITED2 as compared to siControl treatment during adipogenesis. Furthermore, our results demonstrated that when both CITED2 and SUV39H1, a histone lysine methyltransferase that has also been found to be a negative regulator of human adipogenesis, were down regulated, they exerted an accumulative effect in promoting adipogenic differentiation of hMSCs and the expression of both PPAR-gamma and CEBP-alpha, as compared to single gene knock-down. Future studies will investigate how CITED2 and SUV39H1 might potentially physically interact to regulate the promoter activities of PPAR-gamma and CEBP-alpha genes.

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Nov 23rd, 8:45 AM Nov 23rd, 9:30 AM

Role of CITED2 in Human Adipogenesis

104

Currently, there is an estimate of 160 million Americans who are considered obese. Studying the molecular mechanisms involved in the development, maintenance, and regulation of adipocytes (fat cells) could provide insights on developing new tools to address obesity. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) are adult stem cells capable of self-renewal and upon receiving appropriate external stimuli, can differentiate into adipocytes through a process called adipogenesis. In this study, we examined the role of CITED2, a Cbp/p300 Interacting Transactivator with Glu/Asp Rich Carboxy-Terminal Domain 2, during human adipogensis using hMSCs as an in vitro cellular model. Our results demonstrated that CITED2 was normally down regulated during adipogenic differentiation of hMSCs. When its expression was further knocked down by siCITED2 introduced into hMSCs during adipogenic initiation, it resulted in significantly accelerated adipocyte maturation and increased differentiation efficiency, indicating that CITED2 normally acts as a negative regulator of human adipogenesis. Correspondingly, the expression of PPAR-gamma and CEBP-alpha, two transcription factors known as master regulators of adipogenesis, was also significantly enhanced by siCITED2 as compared to siControl treatment during adipogenesis. Furthermore, our results demonstrated that when both CITED2 and SUV39H1, a histone lysine methyltransferase that has also been found to be a negative regulator of human adipogenesis, were down regulated, they exerted an accumulative effect in promoting adipogenic differentiation of hMSCs and the expression of both PPAR-gamma and CEBP-alpha, as compared to single gene knock-down. Future studies will investigate how CITED2 and SUV39H1 might potentially physically interact to regulate the promoter activities of PPAR-gamma and CEBP-alpha genes.