Presentation Title

Silver Acetate as an Anti-Microbial Agent for Managing Water Quality

Faculty Mentor

Zyta Ziora

Start Date

23-11-2019 8:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 9:30 AM

Location

106

Session

poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Recreational water illnesses are caused by the intake of water that is contaminated with varying pathogenic microorganisms. Treatment for recreational water is predominantly done using chlorination through electrolysis, which is effective though highly reactive. To improve the water quality in swimming pool water, silver acetate was used as a bactericidal agent. A model consisting of artificial sweat mixture liquid was used for sampling. A fixed number of three common pool bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureus, was added into the artificial swimming pool model, along with silver acetate in concentrations ranging from 2 to 16mg/L. Samples were taken immediately after the addition of silver, and 2, 4, and 24 hours afterwards. Results show that the effect of the highest proposed minimum inhibitory concentration of silver acetate, 16mg/L, was statistically insignificant. This study demonstrated the use of silver acetate as a potential disinfection agent in managing water quality.

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Nov 23rd, 8:45 AM Nov 23rd, 9:30 AM

Silver Acetate as an Anti-Microbial Agent for Managing Water Quality

106

Recreational water illnesses are caused by the intake of water that is contaminated with varying pathogenic microorganisms. Treatment for recreational water is predominantly done using chlorination through electrolysis, which is effective though highly reactive. To improve the water quality in swimming pool water, silver acetate was used as a bactericidal agent. A model consisting of artificial sweat mixture liquid was used for sampling. A fixed number of three common pool bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureus, was added into the artificial swimming pool model, along with silver acetate in concentrations ranging from 2 to 16mg/L. Samples were taken immediately after the addition of silver, and 2, 4, and 24 hours afterwards. Results show that the effect of the highest proposed minimum inhibitory concentration of silver acetate, 16mg/L, was statistically insignificant. This study demonstrated the use of silver acetate as a potential disinfection agent in managing water quality.