Presentation Title

Changes in gene expression of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes are hallmarks of cancer, and regulation of gene expression can be determined by the structure of the chromosomes themselves. In our cells, DNA is wrapped around histones and compacted into chromatin. In changing the level of a gene’s compaction, from loosely- to tightly-packed chromatin, the accessibility for expression of the gene is altered. Chromodomain Helicase DNA Binding Protein 1 (CHD1) is conserved from yeast to fruit flies to man, and its loss in humans is associated with prostate cancer. To understand the function of CHD1 in the regulation of chromatin structure, I use fruit flies, Drosophila melanogaster, as a model organism. I made use of a powerful assay, called Position Effect Variegation (PEV), to visualize and understand how CHD1 alters gene expression through chromatin structure. By changing the chromosomal position of the white gene from euchromatin to heterochromatin, one observes a mosaic expression of the eye color in D. melanogaster. This eye color therefore serves as a read out of chromatin structure. My findings suggest that a gene localized to pericentric chromatin depends on CHD1 for silencing, presumably through repressive chromatin. This was an unexpected and exciting result given our current understanding of CHD1. My current efforts make use of confocal microscopy to visualize polytene chromosomes in live nuclei to further investigate CHD1 function. More specifically, I examine how the overexpression or RNAi knockdown of Chd1 alter the incorporation of linker histone H1 and global chromosome structure

Faculty Mentor

Jennifer Armstrong

Start Date

23-11-2019 8:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 9:30 AM

Location

110

Session

poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Changes in gene expression of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes are hallmarks of cancer, and regulation of gene expression can be determined by the structure of the chromosomes themselves. In our cells, DNA is wrapped around histones and compacted into chromatin. In changing the level of a gene’s compaction, from loosely- to tightly-packed chromatin, the accessibility for expression of the gene is altered. Chromodomain Helicase DNA Binding Protein 1 (CHD1) is conserved from yeast to fruit flies to man, and its loss in humans is associated with prostate cancer. To understand the function of CHD1 in the regulation of chromatin structure, I use fruit flies, Drosophila melanogaster, as a model organism. I made use of a powerful assay, called Position Effect Variegation (PEV), to visualize and understand how CHD1 alters gene expression through chromatin structure. By changing the chromosomal position of the white gene from euchromatin to heterochromatin, one observes a mosaic expression of the eye color in D. melanogaster. This eye color therefore serves as a read out of chromatin structure. My findings suggest that a gene localized to pericentric chromatin depends on CHD1 for silencing, presumably through repressive chromatin. This was an unexpected and exciting result given our current understanding of CHD1. My current efforts make use of confocal microscopy to visualize polytene chromosomes in live nuclei to further investigate CHD1 function. More specifically, I examine how the overexpression or RNAi knockdown of Chd1 alter the incorporation of linker histone H1 and global chromosome structure.

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Nov 23rd, 8:45 AM Nov 23rd, 9:30 AM

Changes in gene expression of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes are hallmarks of cancer, and regulation of gene expression can be determined by the structure of the chromosomes themselves. In our cells, DNA is wrapped around histones and compacted into chromatin. In changing the level of a gene’s compaction, from loosely- to tightly-packed chromatin, the accessibility for expression of the gene is altered. Chromodomain Helicase DNA Binding Protein 1 (CHD1) is conserved from yeast to fruit flies to man, and its loss in humans is associated with prostate cancer. To understand the function of CHD1 in the regulation of chromatin structure, I use fruit flies, Drosophila melanogaster, as a model organism. I made use of a powerful assay, called Position Effect Variegation (PEV), to visualize and understand how CHD1 alters gene expression through chromatin structure. By changing the chromosomal position of the white gene from euchromatin to heterochromatin, one observes a mosaic expression of the eye color in D. melanogaster. This eye color therefore serves as a read out of chromatin structure. My findings suggest that a gene localized to pericentric chromatin depends on CHD1 for silencing, presumably through repressive chromatin. This was an unexpected and exciting result given our current understanding of CHD1. My current efforts make use of confocal microscopy to visualize polytene chromosomes in live nuclei to further investigate CHD1 function. More specifically, I examine how the overexpression or RNAi knockdown of Chd1 alter the incorporation of linker histone H1 and global chromosome structure

110

Changes in gene expression of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes are hallmarks of cancer, and regulation of gene expression can be determined by the structure of the chromosomes themselves. In our cells, DNA is wrapped around histones and compacted into chromatin. In changing the level of a gene’s compaction, from loosely- to tightly-packed chromatin, the accessibility for expression of the gene is altered. Chromodomain Helicase DNA Binding Protein 1 (CHD1) is conserved from yeast to fruit flies to man, and its loss in humans is associated with prostate cancer. To understand the function of CHD1 in the regulation of chromatin structure, I use fruit flies, Drosophila melanogaster, as a model organism. I made use of a powerful assay, called Position Effect Variegation (PEV), to visualize and understand how CHD1 alters gene expression through chromatin structure. By changing the chromosomal position of the white gene from euchromatin to heterochromatin, one observes a mosaic expression of the eye color in D. melanogaster. This eye color therefore serves as a read out of chromatin structure. My findings suggest that a gene localized to pericentric chromatin depends on CHD1 for silencing, presumably through repressive chromatin. This was an unexpected and exciting result given our current understanding of CHD1. My current efforts make use of confocal microscopy to visualize polytene chromosomes in live nuclei to further investigate CHD1 function. More specifically, I examine how the overexpression or RNAi knockdown of Chd1 alter the incorporation of linker histone H1 and global chromosome structure.