Presentation Title

Aggregation of HEK 293 Tumorigenic Cell Line Using Sound Waves of Varying Frequencies

Faculty Mentor

Carlos Luna Lopez

Start Date

23-11-2019 8:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 9:30 AM

Location

118

Session

poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Acoustic sound waves have been applied to the cellular biology field as a method to manipulate cells. The usage of sound at specific frequencies is beneficial as it is non-contact and non-destructive. In this project, the ability to manipulate the position and aggregate tumor cells into groups using acoustic sound waves is tested. This could be effective in the removal of tumors creating clear margins for extraction. An acoustic sound wave device was created to study the frequency at which cancer cells can be manipulated.

The acoustic sound wave device was designed using a nucleo microcontroller, breadboard, and a transducer. Using open source libraries and coding in C++, the transducer was programmed to apply pulse width modulation (PWM) to project desired frequencies.

HEK 293 tumorigenic cell line were plated and subjected to varying frequencies (523.25 Hz to 987.77 Hz) at different time points (30 minutes or 24 hours). Following the experiment the HEK 293 cells were fixed using paraformaldehyde. The cells were stained using DAPI and phalloidin, targeting the nuclei and actin cytoskeleton. Images were captured through the Keyence Digital Microscope and ran through ImageJ to stitch and create a comprehensive map of the plated cells. The cohesive image was analyzed with respect to the area in which the transducer was located.

Transducer-generated waves initiated HEK 293 movement immediately, movement was maintained for 30 minutes or 24 hours. Frequencies from 523.25 Hz to 987.77 Hz generated suitable waves for cells to move either towards or away from the transducer. Specifically, 523.25 hertz have move cells at a rapid rate, whereas 987.77 hertz move cells at a slower rate. Next, the number of transducers will be modified so the cells can be moved to a specific point, rate, and direction.

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Nov 23rd, 8:45 AM Nov 23rd, 9:30 AM

Aggregation of HEK 293 Tumorigenic Cell Line Using Sound Waves of Varying Frequencies

118

Acoustic sound waves have been applied to the cellular biology field as a method to manipulate cells. The usage of sound at specific frequencies is beneficial as it is non-contact and non-destructive. In this project, the ability to manipulate the position and aggregate tumor cells into groups using acoustic sound waves is tested. This could be effective in the removal of tumors creating clear margins for extraction. An acoustic sound wave device was created to study the frequency at which cancer cells can be manipulated.

The acoustic sound wave device was designed using a nucleo microcontroller, breadboard, and a transducer. Using open source libraries and coding in C++, the transducer was programmed to apply pulse width modulation (PWM) to project desired frequencies.

HEK 293 tumorigenic cell line were plated and subjected to varying frequencies (523.25 Hz to 987.77 Hz) at different time points (30 minutes or 24 hours). Following the experiment the HEK 293 cells were fixed using paraformaldehyde. The cells were stained using DAPI and phalloidin, targeting the nuclei and actin cytoskeleton. Images were captured through the Keyence Digital Microscope and ran through ImageJ to stitch and create a comprehensive map of the plated cells. The cohesive image was analyzed with respect to the area in which the transducer was located.

Transducer-generated waves initiated HEK 293 movement immediately, movement was maintained for 30 minutes or 24 hours. Frequencies from 523.25 Hz to 987.77 Hz generated suitable waves for cells to move either towards or away from the transducer. Specifically, 523.25 hertz have move cells at a rapid rate, whereas 987.77 hertz move cells at a slower rate. Next, the number of transducers will be modified so the cells can be moved to a specific point, rate, and direction.