Presentation Title

Increased concentrations in bacteria, nutrients and dissolved organic carbon during storm events in urban rivers

Faculty Mentor

Natalie Mladenov

Start Date

23-11-2019 8:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 9:30 AM

Location

152

Session

poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

engineering_computer_science

Abstract

Abstract: Storm events flush contaminants from surrounding areas into urban rivers during the winter. Prior to storm events, a fire occurred in the stretch of the river where the data was collected. High flood volume and large amounts of contaminant loadings caused significant decrease in the overall water quality of surface water. Ultimately, the amount of contaminants in the river exceeds the Water Board’s allowable limits for pollutants and causes beach closures and impact local recreational areas.

The aim of this study was to compare base flow water quality data to rain events, which were sampled once a month during the dry season and twice during the winter. Enterococci and E. Coli bacteria were monitored using Idexx Enterolert 250 and Colilert test kits. Nitrate and phosphate concentrations were measured using reagents and a spectrophotometer. Dissolved organic carbon was also monitored.

The storm events during the winter caused large amounts of runoff, which flushed large amounts of contaminants above normal baseflow. The amount of E. Coli during February was three times higher than the average and Enterococci levels was four times higher than normal. During the same month, both nitrate and phosphate concentrations were 3 times higher than normal baseflow and exceeds the Water Board’s allowable limits for pollutants. After analyzing dissolved organic carbon, total nitrogen content spiked during the same period. Bacteria, nutrients and dissolved organic carbon levels all increase due to the same storm event, which resulted in a decrease in overall water quality.

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Nov 23rd, 8:45 AM Nov 23rd, 9:30 AM

Increased concentrations in bacteria, nutrients and dissolved organic carbon during storm events in urban rivers

152

Abstract: Storm events flush contaminants from surrounding areas into urban rivers during the winter. Prior to storm events, a fire occurred in the stretch of the river where the data was collected. High flood volume and large amounts of contaminant loadings caused significant decrease in the overall water quality of surface water. Ultimately, the amount of contaminants in the river exceeds the Water Board’s allowable limits for pollutants and causes beach closures and impact local recreational areas.

The aim of this study was to compare base flow water quality data to rain events, which were sampled once a month during the dry season and twice during the winter. Enterococci and E. Coli bacteria were monitored using Idexx Enterolert 250 and Colilert test kits. Nitrate and phosphate concentrations were measured using reagents and a spectrophotometer. Dissolved organic carbon was also monitored.

The storm events during the winter caused large amounts of runoff, which flushed large amounts of contaminants above normal baseflow. The amount of E. Coli during February was three times higher than the average and Enterococci levels was four times higher than normal. During the same month, both nitrate and phosphate concentrations were 3 times higher than normal baseflow and exceeds the Water Board’s allowable limits for pollutants. After analyzing dissolved organic carbon, total nitrogen content spiked during the same period. Bacteria, nutrients and dissolved organic carbon levels all increase due to the same storm event, which resulted in a decrease in overall water quality.