Presentation Title

Design, Fabrication and Testing of Miniature Satellite - TechEDSat

Faculty Mentor

Sagil James, Kiran George

Start Date

23-11-2019 8:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 9:30 AM

Location

160

Session

poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

engineering_computer_science

Abstract

When people usually think of satellites, they usually think of a huge, heavy, and clunky device. Sending large satellites to space can get very costly. The average cost to launch a satellite to orbit can range from 50 to 400 million US dollars, depending on the size and weight of the satellite. According to United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA), there have been 8,378 objects launched into space. Out of the 8,378 object launched, about 5,000 are currently still in orbit. With that in mind, the outer space we share is a lot more polluted that many may think. Although one may not see it, many of these huge objects are flying right over our heads. Recently, there have been a huge interest in developing miniature versions of satellites. These satellites are capable of completing all the tasks of their larger counterparts while physically reducing its size. The goal of this project is to design and fabricate a lightweight, structurally sound cube shaped satellite – TechEdSat, that can withstand the extreme conditions of space. Much like the larger satellites, the proposed cube sat can gather weather information, atmospheric data, and survey/collect earth science data. Pursuing this project would significantly decrease costs of launching satellites to space as each cube of 1U costs approximately 100,000 US dollars to launch into space. With outer space currently littered with large satellites, replacing with these cube satellites would allow us to reduce litter while creating more room for our smaller and more efficient satellites. These can also potentially reduce the litter created when re-entering Earth’s atmosphere. In conclusion this project would affect the environment in a positive way, while still benefiting the Earth’s inhabitants by essentially reducing cost and better utilizing the space we share.

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Nov 23rd, 8:45 AM Nov 23rd, 9:30 AM

Design, Fabrication and Testing of Miniature Satellite - TechEDSat

160

When people usually think of satellites, they usually think of a huge, heavy, and clunky device. Sending large satellites to space can get very costly. The average cost to launch a satellite to orbit can range from 50 to 400 million US dollars, depending on the size and weight of the satellite. According to United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA), there have been 8,378 objects launched into space. Out of the 8,378 object launched, about 5,000 are currently still in orbit. With that in mind, the outer space we share is a lot more polluted that many may think. Although one may not see it, many of these huge objects are flying right over our heads. Recently, there have been a huge interest in developing miniature versions of satellites. These satellites are capable of completing all the tasks of their larger counterparts while physically reducing its size. The goal of this project is to design and fabricate a lightweight, structurally sound cube shaped satellite – TechEdSat, that can withstand the extreme conditions of space. Much like the larger satellites, the proposed cube sat can gather weather information, atmospheric data, and survey/collect earth science data. Pursuing this project would significantly decrease costs of launching satellites to space as each cube of 1U costs approximately 100,000 US dollars to launch into space. With outer space currently littered with large satellites, replacing with these cube satellites would allow us to reduce litter while creating more room for our smaller and more efficient satellites. These can also potentially reduce the litter created when re-entering Earth’s atmosphere. In conclusion this project would affect the environment in a positive way, while still benefiting the Earth’s inhabitants by essentially reducing cost and better utilizing the space we share.