Presentation Title

Examining Methods to Improve Cognitive Reflection Test Performance

Faculty Mentor

Dustin Calvillo

Start Date

23-11-2019 8:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 9:30 AM

Location

18

Session

poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Cognitive reflection is the ability to inhibit intuitive, incorrect responses in favor of deliberative and correct responses. Cognitive reflection is measured with the Cognitive Reflection Test (CRT). Performance on the CRT predicts performance on a wide span of mental tasks, including reasoning tasks, heuristics-and-biases tasks, and discernment between real and fake news headlines. The goal of the present study was to examine interventions that may improve performance on the CRT. Participants (N = 65) completed a 10-item CRT, were assigned to one of three intervention conditions, and then completed another 10-item CRT. Participants in the control condition did not receive any information between the two CRTs. After the first CRT, participants in the feedback condition were provided with correct answers and explanations for their first CRT and participants in the consider-the-opposite condition were instructed to think of reasons why their initial responses may be incorrect and why other options may be correct. Accuracy scores significantly increased between the first and second CRT in both the feedback and consider-the-opposite groups, but not in the control group. These results suggest that the receiving feedback and instructions to reconsider one’s initial responses were effective strategies in improving accuracy on the CRT. Future research should examine if increases in CRT performance transfer to increased performance on related tasks.

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Nov 23rd, 8:45 AM Nov 23rd, 9:30 AM

Examining Methods to Improve Cognitive Reflection Test Performance

18

Cognitive reflection is the ability to inhibit intuitive, incorrect responses in favor of deliberative and correct responses. Cognitive reflection is measured with the Cognitive Reflection Test (CRT). Performance on the CRT predicts performance on a wide span of mental tasks, including reasoning tasks, heuristics-and-biases tasks, and discernment between real and fake news headlines. The goal of the present study was to examine interventions that may improve performance on the CRT. Participants (N = 65) completed a 10-item CRT, were assigned to one of three intervention conditions, and then completed another 10-item CRT. Participants in the control condition did not receive any information between the two CRTs. After the first CRT, participants in the feedback condition were provided with correct answers and explanations for their first CRT and participants in the consider-the-opposite condition were instructed to think of reasons why their initial responses may be incorrect and why other options may be correct. Accuracy scores significantly increased between the first and second CRT in both the feedback and consider-the-opposite groups, but not in the control group. These results suggest that the receiving feedback and instructions to reconsider one’s initial responses were effective strategies in improving accuracy on the CRT. Future research should examine if increases in CRT performance transfer to increased performance on related tasks.