Presentation Title

Investigating Racial Differences in Stage Shift for Lung Cancer After the Introduction of Screening Guidelines

Faculty Mentor

Dr.Caroline Thompson

Start Date

23-11-2019 8:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 9:30 AM

Location

182

Session

poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

health_nutrition_clinical_science

Abstract

Lung cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer and the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. In 2013, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) began recommending lung cancer screening for adults between the ages of 55 to 80 and those who have had a 30 pack-year-smoking history. Additionally, one must be a current smoker or someone who has stopped smoking within the last 15 years. When assessing the efficacy of new cancer screening, stage shift is used as an appropriate metric on determining the state of cancer. Stage shifting is an early detector of figuring out what phase cancer may or may not be. Non-attendance to lung cancer screening increases the likelihood of later stage at diagnosis which may lead to lower life expectancy. Despite the potentially life-saving benefits of those who may get screened for lung cancer, Blacks may be less likely to be screened in comparison to Whites. One explanation for this could be differences in geographic location, socioeconomic status, access to health care, health literacy, and education. In this study, we aim to describe population rates of lung cancer diagnosis by stage comparing Blacks and Whites overall and by geography before and after the introduction in screening guidelines. We hypothesize that Blacks would be less likely to uptake new screening guidelines and as a result, there would be less evidence of a stage shift for Blacks compared to Whites. Data was obtained using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (Seer 21 Registry) from 2009 to 2016. Using SEER*Stat, we extracted proportions of lung cancer diagnosis by stage and year. We stratified by race looking at Blacks and Whites. We also looked at the geographical regions of the United States such as the West (California,Idaho,Utah,Washington), Northeast (New York,New Jersey,Connecticut,Massachusetts),Northwest (Minnesota,Wisconsin),Southwest (New Mexico), and Southeast (Kentucky,Louisiana,Kentucky).

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Nov 23rd, 8:45 AM Nov 23rd, 9:30 AM

Investigating Racial Differences in Stage Shift for Lung Cancer After the Introduction of Screening Guidelines

182

Lung cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer and the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. In 2013, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) began recommending lung cancer screening for adults between the ages of 55 to 80 and those who have had a 30 pack-year-smoking history. Additionally, one must be a current smoker or someone who has stopped smoking within the last 15 years. When assessing the efficacy of new cancer screening, stage shift is used as an appropriate metric on determining the state of cancer. Stage shifting is an early detector of figuring out what phase cancer may or may not be. Non-attendance to lung cancer screening increases the likelihood of later stage at diagnosis which may lead to lower life expectancy. Despite the potentially life-saving benefits of those who may get screened for lung cancer, Blacks may be less likely to be screened in comparison to Whites. One explanation for this could be differences in geographic location, socioeconomic status, access to health care, health literacy, and education. In this study, we aim to describe population rates of lung cancer diagnosis by stage comparing Blacks and Whites overall and by geography before and after the introduction in screening guidelines. We hypothesize that Blacks would be less likely to uptake new screening guidelines and as a result, there would be less evidence of a stage shift for Blacks compared to Whites. Data was obtained using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (Seer 21 Registry) from 2009 to 2016. Using SEER*Stat, we extracted proportions of lung cancer diagnosis by stage and year. We stratified by race looking at Blacks and Whites. We also looked at the geographical regions of the United States such as the West (California,Idaho,Utah,Washington), Northeast (New York,New Jersey,Connecticut,Massachusetts),Northwest (Minnesota,Wisconsin),Southwest (New Mexico), and Southeast (Kentucky,Louisiana,Kentucky).