Presentation Title

Individual Variability of Consonant Acquisition Between 12-36 Months of Age: A Quantitative Case Study of Two Children

Faculty Mentor

Namhee Kim

Start Date

23-11-2019 8:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 9:30 AM

Location

184

Session

poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

health_nutrition_clinical_science

Abstract

This longitudinal case study examines consonant acquisition of two children while considering individual variability of consonant accuracy and error patterns. The purpose of this study is to analyze data collected to determine 1) overall consonant accuracy of CVC and CVCV word forms; 2) consonant error patterns as they relate to syllable structure; and 3) individual variation in speech error patterns of the two children. Studies have reported general patterns of consonant phoneme acquisition and error patterns from cross-sectional data as well as across languages. Few studies have quantitatively analyzed individual variations of accuracy and error patterns during consonant acquisition using longitudinal data. Few studies have reported characteristic patterns of consonant accuracy and errors from different syllable types. Phonetic transcriptions of spontaneous speech produced by two typically developing, American-English speaking children during ages 12 to 36 months were collected from the CHILDES database. Consonants of CVC and CVCV word forms produced by the participants were analyzed for place and manner of articulation accuracy and types of error patterns, using Microsoft Excel. Results demonstrate an overall pattern of greater productions and consonant errors in the CVC word forms compared to the CVCV word forms, with individual differences in types of error patterns between CVC and CVCV syllable structures; describing the two children’s consonant productions and their differences by reporting frequency of errors and percentages of error types. Child A produced CVC word forms with 42.74% accuracy and CVCV word forms with 58.72% accuracy. Child B produced CVC word forms with 33.89% accuracy and CVCV word forms with 73.38% accuracy. Results indicate CVC and CVCV forms in these two children’s speech production may involve different articulatory movement. This study reveals possible clinical implications of considering individual variances regarding consonant acquisition and error patterns, as they relate to syllable structure, when assessing children’s speech.

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Nov 23rd, 8:45 AM Nov 23rd, 9:30 AM

Individual Variability of Consonant Acquisition Between 12-36 Months of Age: A Quantitative Case Study of Two Children

184

This longitudinal case study examines consonant acquisition of two children while considering individual variability of consonant accuracy and error patterns. The purpose of this study is to analyze data collected to determine 1) overall consonant accuracy of CVC and CVCV word forms; 2) consonant error patterns as they relate to syllable structure; and 3) individual variation in speech error patterns of the two children. Studies have reported general patterns of consonant phoneme acquisition and error patterns from cross-sectional data as well as across languages. Few studies have quantitatively analyzed individual variations of accuracy and error patterns during consonant acquisition using longitudinal data. Few studies have reported characteristic patterns of consonant accuracy and errors from different syllable types. Phonetic transcriptions of spontaneous speech produced by two typically developing, American-English speaking children during ages 12 to 36 months were collected from the CHILDES database. Consonants of CVC and CVCV word forms produced by the participants were analyzed for place and manner of articulation accuracy and types of error patterns, using Microsoft Excel. Results demonstrate an overall pattern of greater productions and consonant errors in the CVC word forms compared to the CVCV word forms, with individual differences in types of error patterns between CVC and CVCV syllable structures; describing the two children’s consonant productions and their differences by reporting frequency of errors and percentages of error types. Child A produced CVC word forms with 42.74% accuracy and CVCV word forms with 58.72% accuracy. Child B produced CVC word forms with 33.89% accuracy and CVCV word forms with 73.38% accuracy. Results indicate CVC and CVCV forms in these two children’s speech production may involve different articulatory movement. This study reveals possible clinical implications of considering individual variances regarding consonant acquisition and error patterns, as they relate to syllable structure, when assessing children’s speech.