Presentation Title

Quantification of Particulate matter exposed to women while cooking over an open fire in Udaipur, Rajasthan, India

Faculty Mentor

Adriane Jones

Start Date

23-11-2019 8:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 9:30 AM

Location

188

Session

poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

health_nutrition_clinical_science

Abstract

Particulate matter (PM) consists of both solid particles and liquid droplets found in the air. Sources of PM include unpaved roads, automobiles, smokestacks, and fires. Although PM is ubiquitous, it can pose health risks depending on its size. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the air quality standard for PM 10 and PM 2.5 is 50 µg/m3 and 25 µg/m3, respectively, over 24 hours. In India, air pollution is one of the country’s largest health concerns. In urban areas such as Delhi, PM pollution can reach to 999 µg/m3 of PM 10 and 478 µg/m3 of PM 2.5, exceeding limits set by the WHO. The ambient air in rural areas of India contains fewer pollutants. However, majority of the women cook over an open fire using firewood which exposes them to short-term high levels of PM pollution. This project surveyed women from ~120 households across three rural villages outside of Udaipur, Rajasthan, India in May 2019, and asked questions regarding food preparation and respiratory-related health issues. In addition to the surveys, AirCasting Airbeam 2 portable air sensors were used to measure fine particulate matter in the 10 and 2.5 micrometer size class in both the ambient air and localized air during use of outdoor cookstoves. Specifically, 51% of women cook indoors, 34% of women cook outdoors, and 15% of women cook both indoors and outdoors. The villages’ ambient air pollution was up to 37 µg/m3 of PM 10 and up to 23 µg/m3 of PM 2.5. However, while the women were cooking, averages of PM reached up to 327 µg/m3 for PM 10 and up to 167 µg/m3 for PM 2.5. This study suggests that while air quality in rural areas may be in a healthier range, women are being exposed to acute high levels of PM pollution daily.

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Nov 23rd, 8:45 AM Nov 23rd, 9:30 AM

Quantification of Particulate matter exposed to women while cooking over an open fire in Udaipur, Rajasthan, India

188

Particulate matter (PM) consists of both solid particles and liquid droplets found in the air. Sources of PM include unpaved roads, automobiles, smokestacks, and fires. Although PM is ubiquitous, it can pose health risks depending on its size. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the air quality standard for PM 10 and PM 2.5 is 50 µg/m3 and 25 µg/m3, respectively, over 24 hours. In India, air pollution is one of the country’s largest health concerns. In urban areas such as Delhi, PM pollution can reach to 999 µg/m3 of PM 10 and 478 µg/m3 of PM 2.5, exceeding limits set by the WHO. The ambient air in rural areas of India contains fewer pollutants. However, majority of the women cook over an open fire using firewood which exposes them to short-term high levels of PM pollution. This project surveyed women from ~120 households across three rural villages outside of Udaipur, Rajasthan, India in May 2019, and asked questions regarding food preparation and respiratory-related health issues. In addition to the surveys, AirCasting Airbeam 2 portable air sensors were used to measure fine particulate matter in the 10 and 2.5 micrometer size class in both the ambient air and localized air during use of outdoor cookstoves. Specifically, 51% of women cook indoors, 34% of women cook outdoors, and 15% of women cook both indoors and outdoors. The villages’ ambient air pollution was up to 37 µg/m3 of PM 10 and up to 23 µg/m3 of PM 2.5. However, while the women were cooking, averages of PM reached up to 327 µg/m3 for PM 10 and up to 167 µg/m3 for PM 2.5. This study suggests that while air quality in rural areas may be in a healthier range, women are being exposed to acute high levels of PM pollution daily.