Presentation Title

Rural Reliance on Ground Water in Udaipur, Rajasthan, India

Faculty Mentor

Adriane Jones

Start Date

23-11-2019 8:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 9:30 AM

Location

190

Session

poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

health_nutrition_clinical_science

Abstract

India is a developing country with a current population of 1.37 billion and an expected population of 1.643 billion by 2050. Residents in urban cities such as Mumbai receive their water by dams that have been built on lakes, but rural residents rely on ground-water wells and/or government water tanks and deliveries Well water in India routinely tests positive for high levels of uranium, nitrate, fluoride, and arsenic. Water contamination contributes to 20% to India’s disease. In the state of Rajasthan India there are approximately 40 million people that are drinking contaminated water with chemicals and heavy metals. This study reports the results of a women’s health survey conducted in 137 households across three rural villages located near the city of Udaipur in Rajasthan, India in May of 2019. The survey asked several questions related to freshwater access, including 1) What is/are the primary sources of freshwater, and 2) If and how is the water treated inside the home. Preliminary analysis shows that about 87% of the respondents filter their water and about 58% obtained water from groundwater wells for at least part of the year. We then explored this local reliance on well water within the greater context of ground-water levels for the past year in Rajasthan. We obtained data from “Central Ground Water Board (CGWB)” (http://cgwb.gov.in/wqmaps.html). This data showed that in 2018 the shallowest ground-water depth was about 2 meters below ground level (mbgl), while the deepest was almost 29 mbgl. In addition, the ground-water levels from 1994 to 2018 in Udaipur may be decreasing in both the pre-monsoon and post-monsoon seasons. In the face of a changing climate, rural communities may not be able to rely on ground-water in the future as extreme weather conditions may cause longer periods of floods and droughts.

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Nov 23rd, 8:45 AM Nov 23rd, 9:30 AM

Rural Reliance on Ground Water in Udaipur, Rajasthan, India

190

India is a developing country with a current population of 1.37 billion and an expected population of 1.643 billion by 2050. Residents in urban cities such as Mumbai receive their water by dams that have been built on lakes, but rural residents rely on ground-water wells and/or government water tanks and deliveries Well water in India routinely tests positive for high levels of uranium, nitrate, fluoride, and arsenic. Water contamination contributes to 20% to India’s disease. In the state of Rajasthan India there are approximately 40 million people that are drinking contaminated water with chemicals and heavy metals. This study reports the results of a women’s health survey conducted in 137 households across three rural villages located near the city of Udaipur in Rajasthan, India in May of 2019. The survey asked several questions related to freshwater access, including 1) What is/are the primary sources of freshwater, and 2) If and how is the water treated inside the home. Preliminary analysis shows that about 87% of the respondents filter their water and about 58% obtained water from groundwater wells for at least part of the year. We then explored this local reliance on well water within the greater context of ground-water levels for the past year in Rajasthan. We obtained data from “Central Ground Water Board (CGWB)” (http://cgwb.gov.in/wqmaps.html). This data showed that in 2018 the shallowest ground-water depth was about 2 meters below ground level (mbgl), while the deepest was almost 29 mbgl. In addition, the ground-water levels from 1994 to 2018 in Udaipur may be decreasing in both the pre-monsoon and post-monsoon seasons. In the face of a changing climate, rural communities may not be able to rely on ground-water in the future as extreme weather conditions may cause longer periods of floods and droughts.