Presentation Title

California’s 2017 Wildfires Effects on Air Quality

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Bo Park

Start Date

23-11-2019 8:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 9:30 AM

Location

194

Session

poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

health_nutrition_clinical_science

Abstract

Introduction: Wildfire smoke can cause an increase in the level of air pollution for a duration. Air pollution are disease-causing agents that include nitrogen dioxide, ozone, carbon monoxide, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and aldehydes. The higher level of particulate matter leads to poorer health outcomes for humans and the surrounding environment. This study examines the change in air pollutants in an area before and after an event of a fire.

Method: The 2017 California Fires were identified from the California Department of Forestry & Fire Protection database. The criteria for selecting the wildfire included fires that exceeded more than 1,000 acres and caused significant damage. The data include longitude, latitude, and days finalized for each fire throughout California. The longitude and latitude are used to pinpoint the different cities, zip code, and postal code through Melissa Lookups, which verified any incomplete or fraudulent address. Air pollutant data, which include ozone, particulate matter, carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, and lead, were accessed from the Environmental Protection Agency Air Quality Index Daily Values Report by county. The fire data and air pollution monitor data were linked using the shortest radius matching based on longitude and latitude. One monitor was assigned for each type of air pollutant for each fire.

Results: From the air quality data, 33 air pollutant monitors were included in the analysis. The air quality was compared from two weeks before the wildfire start date to two days after and during the duration of the wildfire. Some air pollutants had significant maximum differences before and after the wildfire. The pollutant with the most considerable significant difference was PM 25, which had a maximum difference of 552.70 ug/m3 LC, PM10 ug/m3 SC had a maximum difference of 262.00, and NO had a difference of 65.30 ppb. The other pollutants that had a maximum difference was CO, which was 4.400 ppm, O3 of 0.05800 ppm, SO2 of 27.400 ppb, and Pb 0.02500 ug/m3 SC.

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Nov 23rd, 8:45 AM Nov 23rd, 9:30 AM

California’s 2017 Wildfires Effects on Air Quality

194

Introduction: Wildfire smoke can cause an increase in the level of air pollution for a duration. Air pollution are disease-causing agents that include nitrogen dioxide, ozone, carbon monoxide, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and aldehydes. The higher level of particulate matter leads to poorer health outcomes for humans and the surrounding environment. This study examines the change in air pollutants in an area before and after an event of a fire.

Method: The 2017 California Fires were identified from the California Department of Forestry & Fire Protection database. The criteria for selecting the wildfire included fires that exceeded more than 1,000 acres and caused significant damage. The data include longitude, latitude, and days finalized for each fire throughout California. The longitude and latitude are used to pinpoint the different cities, zip code, and postal code through Melissa Lookups, which verified any incomplete or fraudulent address. Air pollutant data, which include ozone, particulate matter, carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, and lead, were accessed from the Environmental Protection Agency Air Quality Index Daily Values Report by county. The fire data and air pollution monitor data were linked using the shortest radius matching based on longitude and latitude. One monitor was assigned for each type of air pollutant for each fire.

Results: From the air quality data, 33 air pollutant monitors were included in the analysis. The air quality was compared from two weeks before the wildfire start date to two days after and during the duration of the wildfire. Some air pollutants had significant maximum differences before and after the wildfire. The pollutant with the most considerable significant difference was PM 25, which had a maximum difference of 552.70 ug/m3 LC, PM10 ug/m3 SC had a maximum difference of 262.00, and NO had a difference of 65.30 ppb. The other pollutants that had a maximum difference was CO, which was 4.400 ppm, O3 of 0.05800 ppm, SO2 of 27.400 ppb, and Pb 0.02500 ug/m3 SC.