Presentation Title

An analysis of phthalate exposure and female infertility using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES)

Faculty Mentor

Alice Lee

Start Date

23-11-2019 8:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 9:30 AM

Location

196

Session

poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

health_nutrition_clinical_science

Abstract

Background:

Endocrine disruptors are chemicals that disturb the body’s endocrine system by interfering with the normal activities of endogenous hormones. Phthalates are one group of endocrine disruptors that are found in many consumer products. Previous animal studies have shown phthalate exposure to be associated with accelerated reproductive aging, disruption of folliculogenesis and steroidogenesis, and decreased incidence of pregnancy. However, the effects of phthalates on human reproductive health is less clear.

Methods:

To examine the relationship between phthalates and infertility among females, we used data from the 2015-16 cycle of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), which assesses the health of adults and children in the United States. We included 536 women between the ages of 20-59 in our cross-sectional analysis. Women were classified as having or not having infertility issues using in-person questionnaires and phthalate exposure was determined from urine samples. We considered six phthalate metabolites: mono-benzyl phthalate (MBzP), mono-(2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl) phthalate (MEOH), mono-(2-ethyl)-hexyl phthalate (MEHP), mono-(2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl) phthalate (MEHHP), mono-ethyl phthalate (MEP), and mono-n-butyl phthalate (MBP). A two-sample t-test was utilized to compare mean urinary phthalate metabolite concentrations between women with and without infertility issues.

Results:

We did not observe any statistically significant differences in mean urinary phthalate metabolite concentrations between women with infertility issues and women without. However, mean concentrations of MEP and MBzP were higher in women with infertility issues when compared to women without (189.97 ng/mL versus 157.71 ng/mL for MEP and 17.22 ng/mL versus 10.37 ng/Ml for MBzP, respectively).

Conclusion:

Phthalate exposure does not appear to be associated with female infertility. However, concentrations of MEP and MBzP were notably higher in women with infertility issues, which should be further investigated. A major limitation of the analysis was our small sample size; hence, we plan to pool multiple NHANES cycles to increase statistical power.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 23rd, 8:45 AM Nov 23rd, 9:30 AM

An analysis of phthalate exposure and female infertility using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES)

196

Background:

Endocrine disruptors are chemicals that disturb the body’s endocrine system by interfering with the normal activities of endogenous hormones. Phthalates are one group of endocrine disruptors that are found in many consumer products. Previous animal studies have shown phthalate exposure to be associated with accelerated reproductive aging, disruption of folliculogenesis and steroidogenesis, and decreased incidence of pregnancy. However, the effects of phthalates on human reproductive health is less clear.

Methods:

To examine the relationship between phthalates and infertility among females, we used data from the 2015-16 cycle of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), which assesses the health of adults and children in the United States. We included 536 women between the ages of 20-59 in our cross-sectional analysis. Women were classified as having or not having infertility issues using in-person questionnaires and phthalate exposure was determined from urine samples. We considered six phthalate metabolites: mono-benzyl phthalate (MBzP), mono-(2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl) phthalate (MEOH), mono-(2-ethyl)-hexyl phthalate (MEHP), mono-(2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl) phthalate (MEHHP), mono-ethyl phthalate (MEP), and mono-n-butyl phthalate (MBP). A two-sample t-test was utilized to compare mean urinary phthalate metabolite concentrations between women with and without infertility issues.

Results:

We did not observe any statistically significant differences in mean urinary phthalate metabolite concentrations between women with infertility issues and women without. However, mean concentrations of MEP and MBzP were higher in women with infertility issues when compared to women without (189.97 ng/mL versus 157.71 ng/mL for MEP and 17.22 ng/mL versus 10.37 ng/Ml for MBzP, respectively).

Conclusion:

Phthalate exposure does not appear to be associated with female infertility. However, concentrations of MEP and MBzP were notably higher in women with infertility issues, which should be further investigated. A major limitation of the analysis was our small sample size; hence, we plan to pool multiple NHANES cycles to increase statistical power.