Presentation Title

Does Exploitation of Evolved Landscape Preferences Increase Perceived Housing Value?

Faculty Mentor

Aaron T Goetz

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:00 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

Location

19

Session

poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Environments varied throughout history, and some offered more fitness benefits than others. Evolved landscape preferences may influence several aspects of modern-day society, including how we manipulate our urban environment. In Study 1, we explored the naming conventions of apartment buildings and residential neighborhoods. A content analysis of 2,981 names of apartment buildings and neighborhoods was conducted using a program that employs Google Maps to gather names from each of the 48 contiguous states of the U.S. Each development name was coded as having nature words (e.g. valley), nature analogous words (e.g. west), or non-nature words (e.g. 1st street). Results strongly supported our hypothesis that more apartments and neighborhoods would contain nature words than not. Study 2 consisted of an experimental design where we manipulated images of apartments and neighborhoods to contain either nature names or non-nature names. We hypothesized that apartment buildings and residential neighborhoods containing nature names would be valued higher compared to their non-nature named counterparts. Data is currently being collected for Study 2; we aim to have a sample of 900 by December 2019.

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Nov 23rd, 10:00 AM Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM

Does Exploitation of Evolved Landscape Preferences Increase Perceived Housing Value?

19

Environments varied throughout history, and some offered more fitness benefits than others. Evolved landscape preferences may influence several aspects of modern-day society, including how we manipulate our urban environment. In Study 1, we explored the naming conventions of apartment buildings and residential neighborhoods. A content analysis of 2,981 names of apartment buildings and neighborhoods was conducted using a program that employs Google Maps to gather names from each of the 48 contiguous states of the U.S. Each development name was coded as having nature words (e.g. valley), nature analogous words (e.g. west), or non-nature words (e.g. 1st street). Results strongly supported our hypothesis that more apartments and neighborhoods would contain nature words than not. Study 2 consisted of an experimental design where we manipulated images of apartments and neighborhoods to contain either nature names or non-nature names. We hypothesized that apartment buildings and residential neighborhoods containing nature names would be valued higher compared to their non-nature named counterparts. Data is currently being collected for Study 2; we aim to have a sample of 900 by December 2019.