Presentation Title

How the Climate has Affected the Lives of Rural Women in India

Presenter Information

Samantha VasquezFollow

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Lia Roberts, Dr. Luiza Nogaj, Dr. Adriane Jones

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:00 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

Location

203

Session

poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

interdisciplinary

Abstract

Rural women rely on a stable climate to grow their food supply, access water in wells, and grow crops for traditional forms of medicine. Over the past few years, the climate in rural India has become more extreme: Summers have become increasingly hotter while monsoon season has become increasingly volatile and unpredictable; high water levels have ruined crops in farmlands and damaged infrastructure in the towns. Consequently, agricultural yields have been insufficient to maintain food security for their families, and as wells dry up rural women find themselves completely dependent on government water provisions to survive. Additionally, large monsoon seasons drown many of the successful crops rural women grow while heightened rainwater increases the likeliness of clean water sources being polluted and food supplies being destroyed.

MSMU’s Cohort 3 Research group conducted a qualitative and quantative analysis study in three rural villages in Rajasthan, India. Our goal was to examine the access and dependence of rural women in Indian villages on western medicine, water sources, and government support for labor in the state of Rajasthan, India. In this secondary analysis, I linked NASA’s climate data measuring local temperatures overtime with Indian government data to identify how changes in climate are affecting the supply of food and health access for these women and their families.

My secondary analysis of drought conditions and climate change suggests that global warming is severing traditional reliance these women have on natural remedies and agricultural lifestyles. This adds further insecurity to the women we studied, who are already facing high obstacles to health care access (despite universal healthcare plans), work opportunities, and access to clean water.

The research shows the environmental conditions have negatively impacted the women’s access to healthcare, ability to use traditional remedies, and maintain cultural agriculture livelihoods.

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Nov 23rd, 10:00 AM Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM

How the Climate has Affected the Lives of Rural Women in India

203

Rural women rely on a stable climate to grow their food supply, access water in wells, and grow crops for traditional forms of medicine. Over the past few years, the climate in rural India has become more extreme: Summers have become increasingly hotter while monsoon season has become increasingly volatile and unpredictable; high water levels have ruined crops in farmlands and damaged infrastructure in the towns. Consequently, agricultural yields have been insufficient to maintain food security for their families, and as wells dry up rural women find themselves completely dependent on government water provisions to survive. Additionally, large monsoon seasons drown many of the successful crops rural women grow while heightened rainwater increases the likeliness of clean water sources being polluted and food supplies being destroyed.

MSMU’s Cohort 3 Research group conducted a qualitative and quantative analysis study in three rural villages in Rajasthan, India. Our goal was to examine the access and dependence of rural women in Indian villages on western medicine, water sources, and government support for labor in the state of Rajasthan, India. In this secondary analysis, I linked NASA’s climate data measuring local temperatures overtime with Indian government data to identify how changes in climate are affecting the supply of food and health access for these women and their families.

My secondary analysis of drought conditions and climate change suggests that global warming is severing traditional reliance these women have on natural remedies and agricultural lifestyles. This adds further insecurity to the women we studied, who are already facing high obstacles to health care access (despite universal healthcare plans), work opportunities, and access to clean water.

The research shows the environmental conditions have negatively impacted the women’s access to healthcare, ability to use traditional remedies, and maintain cultural agriculture livelihoods.