Presentation Title

Determining the Isotopic Composition of Extraterrestrial Water Using the Isotopic Characterization Experimental Apparatus

Faculty Mentor

Gerardo Dominguez

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:00 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

Location

225

Session

poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

physical_mathematical_sciences

Abstract

Laboratory analysis of water samples found within primitive meteorite samples offer the best opportunities for precise and direct determinations of the isotopic composition of extraterrestrial water. In this presentation, we describe an apparatus and technique for determining the complete isotopic composition of small water samples extracted from extraterrestrial samples, including halite-water inclusions in the Zag meteorite. The Isotopic Characterization Experimental (ICE) Apparatus consists of a 12-inch diameter Ultra-High-Vacuum chamber (UHV) connected to a HV vacuum line that has an attached septum, a closed cycle helium cryostat, a magnetically levitated turbo pump, an electron gun, and ports for introducing UV light. The vacuum line is designed to allow gases to be introduced into the UHV chamber. Essential to many of our experiments, water samples can be collected or concentrated in one of two cryogenic U-traps to prepare them for isotopic analysis using a Picarro L2120-i (CRD) spectrometer that is attached to the vacuum line. Meteorite water is extracted using a custom made solenoid-based piston device that is attached to the ICE vacuum line. Liberated water vapor from the crushed rock is allowed to leave the chamber via a dust-guarded feed-through into stainless steel vacuum line with a cryogenic U-trap. Using N2 gas, the thawed H2O is then carried into the CRD where $\delta ^{18}$O(t), $\delta^{17}$O(t), and $\delta$D(t) are determined using water standards. We will present the results of our first meteorite water determinations and discuss the ~5-6 increase in isotopic resolution afforded by our techniques. The ICE apparatus will be available to the ICE-FIVE-O SSERVI team to enable studies of surface processes affecting water at the isotopic level of resolution.

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Nov 23rd, 10:00 AM Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM

Determining the Isotopic Composition of Extraterrestrial Water Using the Isotopic Characterization Experimental Apparatus

225

Laboratory analysis of water samples found within primitive meteorite samples offer the best opportunities for precise and direct determinations of the isotopic composition of extraterrestrial water. In this presentation, we describe an apparatus and technique for determining the complete isotopic composition of small water samples extracted from extraterrestrial samples, including halite-water inclusions in the Zag meteorite. The Isotopic Characterization Experimental (ICE) Apparatus consists of a 12-inch diameter Ultra-High-Vacuum chamber (UHV) connected to a HV vacuum line that has an attached septum, a closed cycle helium cryostat, a magnetically levitated turbo pump, an electron gun, and ports for introducing UV light. The vacuum line is designed to allow gases to be introduced into the UHV chamber. Essential to many of our experiments, water samples can be collected or concentrated in one of two cryogenic U-traps to prepare them for isotopic analysis using a Picarro L2120-i (CRD) spectrometer that is attached to the vacuum line. Meteorite water is extracted using a custom made solenoid-based piston device that is attached to the ICE vacuum line. Liberated water vapor from the crushed rock is allowed to leave the chamber via a dust-guarded feed-through into stainless steel vacuum line with a cryogenic U-trap. Using N2 gas, the thawed H2O is then carried into the CRD where $\delta ^{18}$O(t), $\delta^{17}$O(t), and $\delta$D(t) are determined using water standards. We will present the results of our first meteorite water determinations and discuss the ~5-6 increase in isotopic resolution afforded by our techniques. The ICE apparatus will be available to the ICE-FIVE-O SSERVI team to enable studies of surface processes affecting water at the isotopic level of resolution.