Presentation Title

Synthesis of Zn doped Copper Oxide Thin Films for Hydrogen Evolution of Water-Splitting

Faculty Mentor

Alfredo A Martinez-Morales

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:00 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

Location

233

Session

poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

physical_mathematical_sciences

Abstract

Due to an increasing global population, demand for energy is at an all-time high. Fossil fuels and nuclear energy are currently the primary sources of energy but have undesirable environmental consequences and are not sustainable long-term options. A viable energy source alternative is generation of hydrogen fuel from water. In recent years P-type semiconductor copper oxide (CuO) has gained interest as a possible photocathode for photoelectrochemical (PEC) water-splitting. Despite this, CuO is susceptible to photocorrosion during PEC reactions making it unstable and inefficient. By synthesizing Zn doped CuO thin films (Zn:CuO) through electrodeposition, the crystallinity and morphology of the semiconductor can easily be controlled. To observe the change in crystallinity and morphology the thin films are characterized with X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), respectively. By utilizing electrodeposition as a synthesis technique it allows for the manipulation of charge accumulation at the semiconductor/electrolyte interface and allows for the optimization of the efficiency and stability of the Zn:CuO as a photocathode candidate. The addition of the Zn dopant lowers the surface energy of the thin film and decreases the charge accumulation at the semiconductor/electrolyte interface. As a result, the dopant improves the photochemical efficiency (PCE) in the thin film which is observed in a PEC reaction. The PEC reaction takes place in a solar simulator under chopped irradiation that allows observation of the degradation of photocurrent density vs. time and change of kinetic rate during the reaction. This procedure confirms an improvement in efficiency and stability of the Zn:CuO thin film compared to pure CuO. Overall, this process allows for the utilization of Zn:CuO thin films as a viable alternative source for energy production.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 23rd, 10:00 AM Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM

Synthesis of Zn doped Copper Oxide Thin Films for Hydrogen Evolution of Water-Splitting

233

Due to an increasing global population, demand for energy is at an all-time high. Fossil fuels and nuclear energy are currently the primary sources of energy but have undesirable environmental consequences and are not sustainable long-term options. A viable energy source alternative is generation of hydrogen fuel from water. In recent years P-type semiconductor copper oxide (CuO) has gained interest as a possible photocathode for photoelectrochemical (PEC) water-splitting. Despite this, CuO is susceptible to photocorrosion during PEC reactions making it unstable and inefficient. By synthesizing Zn doped CuO thin films (Zn:CuO) through electrodeposition, the crystallinity and morphology of the semiconductor can easily be controlled. To observe the change in crystallinity and morphology the thin films are characterized with X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), respectively. By utilizing electrodeposition as a synthesis technique it allows for the manipulation of charge accumulation at the semiconductor/electrolyte interface and allows for the optimization of the efficiency and stability of the Zn:CuO as a photocathode candidate. The addition of the Zn dopant lowers the surface energy of the thin film and decreases the charge accumulation at the semiconductor/electrolyte interface. As a result, the dopant improves the photochemical efficiency (PCE) in the thin film which is observed in a PEC reaction. The PEC reaction takes place in a solar simulator under chopped irradiation that allows observation of the degradation of photocurrent density vs. time and change of kinetic rate during the reaction. This procedure confirms an improvement in efficiency and stability of the Zn:CuO thin film compared to pure CuO. Overall, this process allows for the utilization of Zn:CuO thin films as a viable alternative source for energy production.