Presentation Title

Behavioral Mechanisms Involved in Oviposition Preference in Drosophila melanogaster

Faculty Mentor

Ashley Carter

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:00 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

Location

25

Session

poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

To reveal the behavioral mechanisms involved in food preference in fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, oviposition choices were compared for pairs of food flavorings. Although it is known that the Drosophila relies on the presence of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisae and acetic acid as oviposition guides, food flavor preferences are largely unknown. Furthermore, the degree to which preferences may be influenced by individual history or even via epigenetic mechanisms is unknown. We mated isogenic and identical parental generation flies and allowed them to oviposit in food flavored with various extracts and observed subsequent oviposition preferences in their offspring (individuals exposed to the flavors) and F1 generation flies (which were exposed to control food lacking the flavors). Our data showed that exposure in earlier stages of development, and even in parents' larval environments, may modify Drosophila food preferences. These results have implications for insect population control and sympatric speciation.

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Nov 23rd, 10:00 AM Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM

Behavioral Mechanisms Involved in Oviposition Preference in Drosophila melanogaster

25

To reveal the behavioral mechanisms involved in food preference in fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, oviposition choices were compared for pairs of food flavorings. Although it is known that the Drosophila relies on the presence of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisae and acetic acid as oviposition guides, food flavor preferences are largely unknown. Furthermore, the degree to which preferences may be influenced by individual history or even via epigenetic mechanisms is unknown. We mated isogenic and identical parental generation flies and allowed them to oviposit in food flavored with various extracts and observed subsequent oviposition preferences in their offspring (individuals exposed to the flavors) and F1 generation flies (which were exposed to control food lacking the flavors). Our data showed that exposure in earlier stages of development, and even in parents' larval environments, may modify Drosophila food preferences. These results have implications for insect population control and sympatric speciation.