Presentation Title

Perceived Changes about Underlying Factors of Motor Skills Acquisition: Age and Gender Effects

Faculty Mentor

David D. Chen

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:00 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

Location

29

Session

poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

With recent advances in research and theory development, twelve key principles of motor skill have been identified (Chen, 2019). The objective of this study was to examine if students’ perceptions about these principles would change after completing a motor learning and control class. We surveyed 139 undergraduate students (Mean = 22.58; SD=2.55) using the Perceived Changes about Underlying Factors of Motor Learning Scale (Chen, 2019), a 12-item measure with a 5 – point Likert scale. Ages were broken into two groups (i.e, between 18 and 24 and 25 or older). A mixed-design ANOVA with repeated measures did not yield any significant findings. Chi square analyses of independence were conducted to examine how age and gender would affect the way the 12 survey questions were answered. The significant relation between age and mentoring showed that students age 25 or older tend to emphasize the benefits of learning under expert guidance, χ2 (4, N=138) = 9.516, p<.05. Other significant age effects showed that students ages 18 and 24 are more inclined to appreciate the value of taking time to master the basics (χ2 (3, N=138) = 11.208, p=.011) and are more inclined to agree that conscious control decreases with practice (χ2 (4, N=138) = 14.372, p=.006). Age effects cross-tabulation shows females are in favor of using mental practice for skill acquisition (χ2 (2, N=139) = 6.769, p<.05). Overall, students agree that taking the class has altered their perceptions (Grand Mean = 4.254, SD=.061). The results will be discussed in the context of current trends in motor learning research and theory development.

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Nov 23rd, 10:00 AM Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM

Perceived Changes about Underlying Factors of Motor Skills Acquisition: Age and Gender Effects

29

With recent advances in research and theory development, twelve key principles of motor skill have been identified (Chen, 2019). The objective of this study was to examine if students’ perceptions about these principles would change after completing a motor learning and control class. We surveyed 139 undergraduate students (Mean = 22.58; SD=2.55) using the Perceived Changes about Underlying Factors of Motor Learning Scale (Chen, 2019), a 12-item measure with a 5 – point Likert scale. Ages were broken into two groups (i.e, between 18 and 24 and 25 or older). A mixed-design ANOVA with repeated measures did not yield any significant findings. Chi square analyses of independence were conducted to examine how age and gender would affect the way the 12 survey questions were answered. The significant relation between age and mentoring showed that students age 25 or older tend to emphasize the benefits of learning under expert guidance, χ2 (4, N=138) = 9.516, p<.05. Other significant age effects showed that students ages 18 and 24 are more inclined to appreciate the value of taking time to master the basics (χ2 (3, N=138) = 11.208, p=.011) and are more inclined to agree that conscious control decreases with practice (χ2 (4, N=138) = 14.372, p=.006). Age effects cross-tabulation shows females are in favor of using mental practice for skill acquisition (χ2 (2, N=139) = 6.769, p<.05). Overall, students agree that taking the class has altered their perceptions (Grand Mean = 4.254, SD=.061). The results will be discussed in the context of current trends in motor learning research and theory development.