Presentation Title

Investigating the Anti-Cancer Effects of Curcumin on Canine Osteosarcoma Cells

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Chad L. Barber

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:00 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

Location

55

Session

poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

The most common methods of treating cancer have been surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. Recent studies focusing on using plant-derived treatments may be effective supplemental therapies that are less toxic than standard chemotherapies. Curcumin has been proposed as a new anti-cancer agent for its anti-proliferative and apoptotic properties. Using canine cell lines, I hypothesize that as concentrations of curcumin within the cell culture media increase, both the proliferative capabilities and cell viability will decrease, and the total quantity of apoptotic cells will increase. I have conducted migration assays, MTT assays, and flow cytometry to examine the anti-cancer effects of curcumin on a canine osteosarcoma (D17) cell line. Preliminary results have found that curcumin works in both a time-dependent and dose-dependent manner. Treatments with less than 20 micromolar curcumin, and trials that lasted less than 24 hours, seemed to have little impact on the proliferation and metabolic health of the cancer cells. But as both time and concentration increased beyond those points, the proliferation and cellular viability of the D17 cells decreased, while also triggering higher rates of apoptosis than in controls. Over two-day trials, the proliferation and migration assays showed a decrease in proliferation of the osteosarcoma cells as concentrations of curcumin increased. Similarly, the MTT assays demonstrated fewer viable cells in the treatment groups with higher curcumin concentrations, when compared to the DMSO control group. Flow cytometry data showed that apoptosis rates of the D17 cells also increased as both dose concentration and time of exposure to curcumin increased. Together, these results show that curcumin does seem to have anti-cancer effects, decreasing the growth and health of cancer cells, meaning that it may possibly work as an effective alternative cancer treatment, for canines and humans alike.

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Nov 23rd, 10:00 AM Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM

Investigating the Anti-Cancer Effects of Curcumin on Canine Osteosarcoma Cells

55

The most common methods of treating cancer have been surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. Recent studies focusing on using plant-derived treatments may be effective supplemental therapies that are less toxic than standard chemotherapies. Curcumin has been proposed as a new anti-cancer agent for its anti-proliferative and apoptotic properties. Using canine cell lines, I hypothesize that as concentrations of curcumin within the cell culture media increase, both the proliferative capabilities and cell viability will decrease, and the total quantity of apoptotic cells will increase. I have conducted migration assays, MTT assays, and flow cytometry to examine the anti-cancer effects of curcumin on a canine osteosarcoma (D17) cell line. Preliminary results have found that curcumin works in both a time-dependent and dose-dependent manner. Treatments with less than 20 micromolar curcumin, and trials that lasted less than 24 hours, seemed to have little impact on the proliferation and metabolic health of the cancer cells. But as both time and concentration increased beyond those points, the proliferation and cellular viability of the D17 cells decreased, while also triggering higher rates of apoptosis than in controls. Over two-day trials, the proliferation and migration assays showed a decrease in proliferation of the osteosarcoma cells as concentrations of curcumin increased. Similarly, the MTT assays demonstrated fewer viable cells in the treatment groups with higher curcumin concentrations, when compared to the DMSO control group. Flow cytometry data showed that apoptosis rates of the D17 cells also increased as both dose concentration and time of exposure to curcumin increased. Together, these results show that curcumin does seem to have anti-cancer effects, decreasing the growth and health of cancer cells, meaning that it may possibly work as an effective alternative cancer treatment, for canines and humans alike.