Presentation Title

Temperature effect on survival of Trigriopus californicus

Faculty Mentor

Casey A Mueller

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:00 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

Location

77

Session

poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Trigriopus californicus is a small copepod that inhabits the pacific coast of North America. This organism inhabits pools high in the intertidal zone. These pools experience a wide range of temperatures, changing as much as 17°C in one day. The large geographical distance that this species inhabits allows us to analyze the effect of average temperature on development and survival. Southern California populations experience an average temperature of 23°C, while Oregon populations experience an average temperature of 21°C. As the Southern California populations experience a higher average temperature, we hypothesized that the Southern California populations would have an increased rate of survival compared to the Oregon populations in the higher temperatures. Knowing the average temperatures that these populations experience, we hypothesize that Southern California population’s survival will decrease above 25°C and that Oregon population’s survival will decrease above 20°C. Two populations were collected from Southern California; San Diego (SD) and Bird Rock (BR), and two populations were collected from Oregon; Boiler Bay (BOB) and Strawberry Hill (SH). The populations were maintained at 20°C with a 12:12 L:D cycle for at least one month before use. For each population, three mature egg sacs (characterized by bright orange color) were separated from adult females. Separated egg sacs were placed in a 150ml beaker with 80 ml of 35 ppt Instant Ocean at 20°C, a few drops of Nannochloropis algae, and a small pinch of spirulina powder. This beaker was placed in one of three experimental temperatures: 20°C, 25°C, or 30°C. Offspring hatched the next day and were observed until the copepodid stage. Following this, 10 individuals were selected and their survival monitored every other day by transferring between two beakers, counting how many individuals were alive until adult stage was reached. As temperature increases above 20°C, average survival decreased across all populations.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 23rd, 10:00 AM Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM

Temperature effect on survival of Trigriopus californicus

77

Trigriopus californicus is a small copepod that inhabits the pacific coast of North America. This organism inhabits pools high in the intertidal zone. These pools experience a wide range of temperatures, changing as much as 17°C in one day. The large geographical distance that this species inhabits allows us to analyze the effect of average temperature on development and survival. Southern California populations experience an average temperature of 23°C, while Oregon populations experience an average temperature of 21°C. As the Southern California populations experience a higher average temperature, we hypothesized that the Southern California populations would have an increased rate of survival compared to the Oregon populations in the higher temperatures. Knowing the average temperatures that these populations experience, we hypothesize that Southern California population’s survival will decrease above 25°C and that Oregon population’s survival will decrease above 20°C. Two populations were collected from Southern California; San Diego (SD) and Bird Rock (BR), and two populations were collected from Oregon; Boiler Bay (BOB) and Strawberry Hill (SH). The populations were maintained at 20°C with a 12:12 L:D cycle for at least one month before use. For each population, three mature egg sacs (characterized by bright orange color) were separated from adult females. Separated egg sacs were placed in a 150ml beaker with 80 ml of 35 ppt Instant Ocean at 20°C, a few drops of Nannochloropis algae, and a small pinch of spirulina powder. This beaker was placed in one of three experimental temperatures: 20°C, 25°C, or 30°C. Offspring hatched the next day and were observed until the copepodid stage. Following this, 10 individuals were selected and their survival monitored every other day by transferring between two beakers, counting how many individuals were alive until adult stage was reached. As temperature increases above 20°C, average survival decreased across all populations.