Presentation Title

Rates of biodegradation of 4-nonylphenol via bacteria at the Palisades Glacier in California, USA

Faculty Mentor

Rebecca Lyons

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:00 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

Location

101

Session

poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

4-Nonylphenol (4-NP) is an estrogenic microbial byproduct of nonylphenol polyethoxylate, a commonly used surfactant for pesticides. Because of this, agricultural farmlands creates opportunities for 4-NP to enter the ecosystem. This is problematic because 4-N.P is not easily biodegradable and is capable of long-range transport. Accumulation of 4-NP has been found in the Palisades Glacier in California, due to inshore winds passing through the adjacent Central Valley. Using the mapping software ArcGIS Pro, prior research formulated a geospatial model of 4-NP concentrations based on factors like wind deposition and shielding. However, loss pathways, like biodegradation into a less toxic substrate, can further adjust this model and may even offer opportunities for remediation. Biodegradation rates depend on isomer variation of the nonyl- carbon chain. From previous research, metabolism of the straight chain isomer follows a series of decarboxylation reactions, which was determined to occur at a rate of 4.4 mg per day at room temperature. A branched form of 4-nonylphenol, which tends to be the more estrogenic form, has not be studied in prior work. In this study, bacteria was collected from the Palisades Glaciers, California, USA, and were incubated with varying isomers 4-nonylphenol as the main carbon source. After plating on enriched LB plates, higher colony counts were found at 1 meter depths. These colonies were used for degradation assays. GC/MS and NMR showed changes in concentration and structure of 4-nonylphenol during degradation.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 23rd, 10:00 AM Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM

Rates of biodegradation of 4-nonylphenol via bacteria at the Palisades Glacier in California, USA

101

4-Nonylphenol (4-NP) is an estrogenic microbial byproduct of nonylphenol polyethoxylate, a commonly used surfactant for pesticides. Because of this, agricultural farmlands creates opportunities for 4-NP to enter the ecosystem. This is problematic because 4-N.P is not easily biodegradable and is capable of long-range transport. Accumulation of 4-NP has been found in the Palisades Glacier in California, due to inshore winds passing through the adjacent Central Valley. Using the mapping software ArcGIS Pro, prior research formulated a geospatial model of 4-NP concentrations based on factors like wind deposition and shielding. However, loss pathways, like biodegradation into a less toxic substrate, can further adjust this model and may even offer opportunities for remediation. Biodegradation rates depend on isomer variation of the nonyl- carbon chain. From previous research, metabolism of the straight chain isomer follows a series of decarboxylation reactions, which was determined to occur at a rate of 4.4 mg per day at room temperature. A branched form of 4-nonylphenol, which tends to be the more estrogenic form, has not be studied in prior work. In this study, bacteria was collected from the Palisades Glaciers, California, USA, and were incubated with varying isomers 4-nonylphenol as the main carbon source. After plating on enriched LB plates, higher colony counts were found at 1 meter depths. These colonies were used for degradation assays. GC/MS and NMR showed changes in concentration and structure of 4-nonylphenol during degradation.