Presentation Title

Exploring the Impacts of Anthropogenic Driven Changes with a focus on Southern California Coastal Zones

Faculty Mentor

Jared Ashcroft

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:00 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

Location

103

Session

poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

The increase in population, urbanization, and modernization of communities near the Southern California coastal zones poses problems of climate change and poor waste management. Pollutant accumulation introduced by the increase in anthropogenic contaminants has degraded the aquatic ecosystem. The effects of global warming have had severe effects on the ocean, such as rising sea level and temperature. In this study, the effluent from seaports, nuclear power plants, and high population density zones are analyzed to evaluate the decline in coastal water quality. The four coastal zones under analysis include: Long Beach Port, Santa Monica Pier, Cabrillo and Malibu. Monitoring the concentrations of nitrates, phosphates, magnesium ions, and calcium ions were used to assess their impact on the water quality of coastal waters. A total of 24 samples of seawater were analyzed according to geographical characteristics and major anthropogenic contribution. In conjunction, indirect factors such as pH, temperature, and dissolved oxygen levels were also examined. Variations in these tests may be a good indicator for determining the marine ecosystems and the complex forcing stressors. The resulting data revealed a discrepancy in saturated oxygen levels in Long Beach Port (86.4 %) and Catalina Express Port (76.90%) in comparison to the other beaches. Nitrate (NO3-) levels remained the same for five beaches (10 mg/L) with an exception for Catalina Port with (25 mg/L). The increase in industrial activites at these ports reveal decreased oxygen levels and Nitrate levels impacting the distribution of marine organisms in these regions. Existing reports and data have been synthesized to fill the gaps of knowledge to identify socio-economic demands that require environmental resources. With this research, the relationship between chemistry, biology, and even humanities can be valued, and some solutions for better seawater quality should be raised up and summarized.

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Nov 23rd, 10:00 AM Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM

Exploring the Impacts of Anthropogenic Driven Changes with a focus on Southern California Coastal Zones

103

The increase in population, urbanization, and modernization of communities near the Southern California coastal zones poses problems of climate change and poor waste management. Pollutant accumulation introduced by the increase in anthropogenic contaminants has degraded the aquatic ecosystem. The effects of global warming have had severe effects on the ocean, such as rising sea level and temperature. In this study, the effluent from seaports, nuclear power plants, and high population density zones are analyzed to evaluate the decline in coastal water quality. The four coastal zones under analysis include: Long Beach Port, Santa Monica Pier, Cabrillo and Malibu. Monitoring the concentrations of nitrates, phosphates, magnesium ions, and calcium ions were used to assess their impact on the water quality of coastal waters. A total of 24 samples of seawater were analyzed according to geographical characteristics and major anthropogenic contribution. In conjunction, indirect factors such as pH, temperature, and dissolved oxygen levels were also examined. Variations in these tests may be a good indicator for determining the marine ecosystems and the complex forcing stressors. The resulting data revealed a discrepancy in saturated oxygen levels in Long Beach Port (86.4 %) and Catalina Express Port (76.90%) in comparison to the other beaches. Nitrate (NO3-) levels remained the same for five beaches (10 mg/L) with an exception for Catalina Port with (25 mg/L). The increase in industrial activites at these ports reveal decreased oxygen levels and Nitrate levels impacting the distribution of marine organisms in these regions. Existing reports and data have been synthesized to fill the gaps of knowledge to identify socio-economic demands that require environmental resources. With this research, the relationship between chemistry, biology, and even humanities can be valued, and some solutions for better seawater quality should be raised up and summarized.