Presentation Title

Competitive Districts

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Andrew Busch

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:00 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

Location

123

Session

poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

business_economics_public_administration

Abstract

In 2010, California voters passed Proposition 14, which created a top-two primary for party-affiliated races in the state. The proposition’s intent was to make campaigns less polarized and result in more moderate candidates. Millions of dollars flow into legislative races each year. The Competitive Districts project seeks to evaluate California campaign finance trends in the 2018 election cycle, a follow-up project similar to studies we created for the 2014 and 2016 cycles. The project will analyze campaign expenditures, independent expenditures, and contributions data for individuals running for the California State Senate and State Assembly. The project relies on data from the Cal-Access campaign finance database, which is publicly available on the California Secretary of State’s website. The project’s primary goal is to examine the relationship between levels of spending and electoral outcomes. It also seeks to answer questions about geographic concentrations in campaign contributions, the role of legislative leadership in campaign finance, and whether people and outside organizations are more likely to spend money on safely Democratic seats or swing districts. Competitive Districts has completed its iteration of the 2018 cycle. In the summary of our research below, you will see some of the preliminary findings for our 2018 cycle report.

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Nov 23rd, 10:00 AM Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM

Competitive Districts

123

In 2010, California voters passed Proposition 14, which created a top-two primary for party-affiliated races in the state. The proposition’s intent was to make campaigns less polarized and result in more moderate candidates. Millions of dollars flow into legislative races each year. The Competitive Districts project seeks to evaluate California campaign finance trends in the 2018 election cycle, a follow-up project similar to studies we created for the 2014 and 2016 cycles. The project will analyze campaign expenditures, independent expenditures, and contributions data for individuals running for the California State Senate and State Assembly. The project relies on data from the Cal-Access campaign finance database, which is publicly available on the California Secretary of State’s website. The project’s primary goal is to examine the relationship between levels of spending and electoral outcomes. It also seeks to answer questions about geographic concentrations in campaign contributions, the role of legislative leadership in campaign finance, and whether people and outside organizations are more likely to spend money on safely Democratic seats or swing districts. Competitive Districts has completed its iteration of the 2018 cycle. In the summary of our research below, you will see some of the preliminary findings for our 2018 cycle report.