Presentation Title

Analyzing the Student-Father Experience in Higher Education

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Brianne Dávila, Ph.D., Giselle Navarro-Cruz, Ph.D.

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:00 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

Location

141

Session

poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

education

Abstract

Many college students encounter the struggle of time management; nonetheless, rarely do professors acknowledge the status of student parents in their classrooms (Estes, 2011). Previous studies tend to focus on the experiences of student mothers and rarely compare it with those of student-fathers, reinforcing the highly gendered experience of this growing population (Moreau, 2016). It is important to consider, investigate, and recognize the student parent demographics within higher education as more than 1 in 5 college students in the United States are raising children while simultaneously pursuing an education (Nadworny, 2019). This study aimed to focus on the unique experience of student-fathers as well as the resources that are available and/or would be beneficial to better support them. The study addresses the following questions: What are the challenges that student-fathers face in higher education? How does the experience of student-fathers differ from that of traditional college students? Researchers conducted interviews with twenty-two student-fathers attending a public four-year university. Interviews addressed issues related to: the major changes participants experienced upon becoming student-fathers, challenges experienced in the role of being student-fathers, as well as their prime sources of financial, emotional, and childcare support. These interviews were later reviewed and analyzed to find common themes among the experiences of student-fathers in higher education. Preliminary findings indicate that student-fathers are met with time management challenges, financial issues, gendered expectations, and lack of involvement on campus. The current study hopes to catalyze the expansion and enhancement of university practices and policies to be more inclusive of student-fathers in higher education; ultimately better supporting their academic success.

References:

Estes, D.K. (2011). Managing the Student-Parent Dilemma: Mothers and Fathers in Higher Education. Society for the Study of Symbolic Interaction, (34)2, 198-219.

Moreau, M.P. (2016). Gendering student parents in higher education. In M. Maksimović, J. Ostrouch-Kamińsk, K. Popović, & A. Bulajić (Eds.), Contemporary issues and perspectives on gender research in adult education (pp. 99–113). Belgrade: Institute for Pedagogy and Andragogy, Faculty of Philosophy, University of Belgrade, Serbia.

Nadworny, E. (2019). Colleges Could Do More To Help Student Parents Pay For Child Care, Watchdog Says. National Public Radio (NPR).

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Nov 23rd, 10:00 AM Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM

Analyzing the Student-Father Experience in Higher Education

141

Many college students encounter the struggle of time management; nonetheless, rarely do professors acknowledge the status of student parents in their classrooms (Estes, 2011). Previous studies tend to focus on the experiences of student mothers and rarely compare it with those of student-fathers, reinforcing the highly gendered experience of this growing population (Moreau, 2016). It is important to consider, investigate, and recognize the student parent demographics within higher education as more than 1 in 5 college students in the United States are raising children while simultaneously pursuing an education (Nadworny, 2019). This study aimed to focus on the unique experience of student-fathers as well as the resources that are available and/or would be beneficial to better support them. The study addresses the following questions: What are the challenges that student-fathers face in higher education? How does the experience of student-fathers differ from that of traditional college students? Researchers conducted interviews with twenty-two student-fathers attending a public four-year university. Interviews addressed issues related to: the major changes participants experienced upon becoming student-fathers, challenges experienced in the role of being student-fathers, as well as their prime sources of financial, emotional, and childcare support. These interviews were later reviewed and analyzed to find common themes among the experiences of student-fathers in higher education. Preliminary findings indicate that student-fathers are met with time management challenges, financial issues, gendered expectations, and lack of involvement on campus. The current study hopes to catalyze the expansion and enhancement of university practices and policies to be more inclusive of student-fathers in higher education; ultimately better supporting their academic success.

References:

Estes, D.K. (2011). Managing the Student-Parent Dilemma: Mothers and Fathers in Higher Education. Society for the Study of Symbolic Interaction, (34)2, 198-219.

Moreau, M.P. (2016). Gendering student parents in higher education. In M. Maksimović, J. Ostrouch-Kamińsk, K. Popović, & A. Bulajić (Eds.), Contemporary issues and perspectives on gender research in adult education (pp. 99–113). Belgrade: Institute for Pedagogy and Andragogy, Faculty of Philosophy, University of Belgrade, Serbia.

Nadworny, E. (2019). Colleges Could Do More To Help Student Parents Pay For Child Care, Watchdog Says. National Public Radio (NPR).