Presentation Title

“Social Class, Learning Disabilities and other Factors Impacting Working-Class Latino Males’ Educational Outcomes – A Literature Review”

Faculty Mentor

Marisolo Clark-Ibanez, Stephen Quintana

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:00 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

Location

145

Session

poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

education

Abstract

This literature review focuses on educational disparities of working-class Latino males in American k-12 public education that prevent higher education attainment. Previous research finds that Latino youth are entering and graduating from higher education at significantly lower rates than other males of color because of family socioeconomic status, low resourced neighborhoods, and parents’ educational attainment. This paper highlights studies that examine how micro and classroom level inequalities result in disproportionate enrollment of Latino working-class males in special education which result in higher risk outcomes. Relatedly, I found that a high proportion of Latino males who are placed in special education are also English Language Learners (ELL’s). Scholarship about ELL’s and Learning Disabilities are vast, however, we know less about how identification as an ELL leads to being diagnosed with learning disabilities among Latino youth. Future project will be developing recommendations based on research that will focus on using an equity framework to hold institutions accountable, in order to enhance educational opportunities for Latino males.

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Nov 23rd, 10:00 AM Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM

“Social Class, Learning Disabilities and other Factors Impacting Working-Class Latino Males’ Educational Outcomes – A Literature Review”

145

This literature review focuses on educational disparities of working-class Latino males in American k-12 public education that prevent higher education attainment. Previous research finds that Latino youth are entering and graduating from higher education at significantly lower rates than other males of color because of family socioeconomic status, low resourced neighborhoods, and parents’ educational attainment. This paper highlights studies that examine how micro and classroom level inequalities result in disproportionate enrollment of Latino working-class males in special education which result in higher risk outcomes. Relatedly, I found that a high proportion of Latino males who are placed in special education are also English Language Learners (ELL’s). Scholarship about ELL’s and Learning Disabilities are vast, however, we know less about how identification as an ELL leads to being diagnosed with learning disabilities among Latino youth. Future project will be developing recommendations based on research that will focus on using an equity framework to hold institutions accountable, in order to enhance educational opportunities for Latino males.