Presentation Title

Liquid Desiccant Based, High Efficiency, Inexpensive Heating Air Conditioning and Ventilation System

Faculty Mentor

Darren Banks, Justin Tran, Sagil James

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:00 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

Location

173

Session

poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

engineering_computer_science

Abstract

The air conditioning (AC) unit is one of the highest power consumption pieces of equipment in residential use. During the peak of the summer heat, residents must choose between comfort or high cost. To achieve higher efficiencies, alternative solutions are needed. “Swamp coolers” are used as an efficient alternative to traditional AC, with the downside of increasing the humidity of the cooled room. The goal of this project is to design and fabricate a low-cost high-efficiency heating AC and Ventilation system that exploits the benefits of evaporative cooling without the humidity downside. The proposed system uses a closed-loop desiccant cycle combined with evaporation to address the issues associated with increasing humidity. The AC unit is constructed from widely available, mass-manufactured parts. The fresh, warm, ambient air drawn into the proposed system passes through a series of sub-systems including the liquid desiccant unit, heat exchanger, and the evaporator. Connected to the heat exchanger is a closed evaporative loop that is used to absorb the heat from the warmed, desiccated air. This evaporative loop uses a radiator to regenerate the desiccant by using exterior air to evaporate the surplus moisture. Part of the design seeks to minimize the loss of moisture to keep the cycle self-contained, with emphasis on passive and solar-thermal methods to minimize energy consumption. The proposed technology is an HVAC system with a high Seasonal Energy Efficiency Rating (SEER) that costs the same or less to construct and install than a commercial unit. With higher efficiency, the system is expected to reduce the risk of power outages and surges, cost of operation, and environmental impact. Due to the unique construction, the proposed technology is scalable for small and large applications from suburban single-family homes to apartment complexes and commercial buildings.

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Nov 23rd, 10:00 AM Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM

Liquid Desiccant Based, High Efficiency, Inexpensive Heating Air Conditioning and Ventilation System

173

The air conditioning (AC) unit is one of the highest power consumption pieces of equipment in residential use. During the peak of the summer heat, residents must choose between comfort or high cost. To achieve higher efficiencies, alternative solutions are needed. “Swamp coolers” are used as an efficient alternative to traditional AC, with the downside of increasing the humidity of the cooled room. The goal of this project is to design and fabricate a low-cost high-efficiency heating AC and Ventilation system that exploits the benefits of evaporative cooling without the humidity downside. The proposed system uses a closed-loop desiccant cycle combined with evaporation to address the issues associated with increasing humidity. The AC unit is constructed from widely available, mass-manufactured parts. The fresh, warm, ambient air drawn into the proposed system passes through a series of sub-systems including the liquid desiccant unit, heat exchanger, and the evaporator. Connected to the heat exchanger is a closed evaporative loop that is used to absorb the heat from the warmed, desiccated air. This evaporative loop uses a radiator to regenerate the desiccant by using exterior air to evaporate the surplus moisture. Part of the design seeks to minimize the loss of moisture to keep the cycle self-contained, with emphasis on passive and solar-thermal methods to minimize energy consumption. The proposed technology is an HVAC system with a high Seasonal Energy Efficiency Rating (SEER) that costs the same or less to construct and install than a commercial unit. With higher efficiency, the system is expected to reduce the risk of power outages and surges, cost of operation, and environmental impact. Due to the unique construction, the proposed technology is scalable for small and large applications from suburban single-family homes to apartment complexes and commercial buildings.