Presentation Title

Innovating the Influenza Vaccine for 2019 – 20

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Kathleen Barry

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:00 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

Location

189

Session

poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

health_nutrition_clinical_science

Abstract

Influenza, known colloquially as “the flu”, is a viral infection with worldwide burden and importance. The virus is constantly changing; as a result, we need to develop a new vaccine every year due to how it is currently configured. The goal of this research was to develop a vaccine that is more effective and better engineered than last year’s in order to protect human life and public safety. Through the extensive review of literature to date, the influenza virus was carefully analyzed in order to develop an idea of an improved vaccine for the 2019 – 20 flu year. Viruses from past years were evaluated and analyzed to create a predictive modeling, a method that was derived from a web application model that the Center for Disease Control utilizes to model vaccines from stored patient samples. Our predictive modeling was used to conclude that H3N2, H1N1, and Influenza B are the viruses most likely to spread next season. Based off this result we designed a vaccine that is predicted to have a 15% increase in effectiveness due to perfected ratios of vaccine ingredients. From our results, we have concluded that future studies should focus on building a universal vaccine that would attack the stable spike instead of the mutating head of the influenza virus for greater effectiveness.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 23rd, 10:00 AM Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM

Innovating the Influenza Vaccine for 2019 – 20

189

Influenza, known colloquially as “the flu”, is a viral infection with worldwide burden and importance. The virus is constantly changing; as a result, we need to develop a new vaccine every year due to how it is currently configured. The goal of this research was to develop a vaccine that is more effective and better engineered than last year’s in order to protect human life and public safety. Through the extensive review of literature to date, the influenza virus was carefully analyzed in order to develop an idea of an improved vaccine for the 2019 – 20 flu year. Viruses from past years were evaluated and analyzed to create a predictive modeling, a method that was derived from a web application model that the Center for Disease Control utilizes to model vaccines from stored patient samples. Our predictive modeling was used to conclude that H3N2, H1N1, and Influenza B are the viruses most likely to spread next season. Based off this result we designed a vaccine that is predicted to have a 15% increase in effectiveness due to perfected ratios of vaccine ingredients. From our results, we have concluded that future studies should focus on building a universal vaccine that would attack the stable spike instead of the mutating head of the influenza virus for greater effectiveness.