Presentation Title

Investigation of the Effects of Virtual Reality on Lateral Weight Shifts

Faculty Mentor

Tumay Tunur, Jessica Rodriguez

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:00 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

Location

193

Session

poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

health_nutrition_clinical_science

Abstract

Investigation of the Effects of Virtual Reality on Lateral Weight Shifts

Smith, Carly R., Schneider, Ryan, Whelehon, Sarah, Osete, Jose, Rodriguez, Jessica, Tunur, Tumay

Department of Kinesiology, California State University, San Marcos, CA, 92096

Purpose: In snowboarding, the ability to efficiently shift one’s weight laterally determines how well a snowboarder can control their speed. There are environmental factors that may prevent athletes from training on the mountain. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of virtual reality (VR) training and transferability of VR snowboarding to lateral weight shift (LWS) task. While there is various research on the effect of VR training in other sports, there is a paucity in the literature describing the effect of snowboard training in VR on LWS task. Methods: Initially, a baseline score for LWS task was collected prior to training in snowboarding for all participants (n = 20). Nine subjects were assigned to control group; these subjects partook in ten minutes of Job Sim: Birthday Bot game, while eleven subjects were assigned to the test-group and partook in a VR snowboard activity. Test-group subjects completed five snowboarding trials lasting one minute each, with one-minute breaks in between trials. Results: The average pre-test weight shift activity scores for the test group were not significantly different from control group, indicating no difference in baseline ability (p = 0.824). The same trend was seen for post-test, where there was no significant difference in the percent accuracy of the LWS activity between groups (p = 0.385). However, the percent transfer score in the LWS was higher in the control group (33.33%) than the snowboarding group (7.25%). This would indicate that VR had a negative impact on LWS performance. Conclusions: VR training had negative impact on the balance of the participants in LWS task. This suggests that the participants adapted a different strategy for postural stability than is required for the LWS task. Therefore, future studies should investigate the impact of VR training on balance in detail.

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Nov 23rd, 10:00 AM Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM

Investigation of the Effects of Virtual Reality on Lateral Weight Shifts

193

Investigation of the Effects of Virtual Reality on Lateral Weight Shifts

Smith, Carly R., Schneider, Ryan, Whelehon, Sarah, Osete, Jose, Rodriguez, Jessica, Tunur, Tumay

Department of Kinesiology, California State University, San Marcos, CA, 92096

Purpose: In snowboarding, the ability to efficiently shift one’s weight laterally determines how well a snowboarder can control their speed. There are environmental factors that may prevent athletes from training on the mountain. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of virtual reality (VR) training and transferability of VR snowboarding to lateral weight shift (LWS) task. While there is various research on the effect of VR training in other sports, there is a paucity in the literature describing the effect of snowboard training in VR on LWS task. Methods: Initially, a baseline score for LWS task was collected prior to training in snowboarding for all participants (n = 20). Nine subjects were assigned to control group; these subjects partook in ten minutes of Job Sim: Birthday Bot game, while eleven subjects were assigned to the test-group and partook in a VR snowboard activity. Test-group subjects completed five snowboarding trials lasting one minute each, with one-minute breaks in between trials. Results: The average pre-test weight shift activity scores for the test group were not significantly different from control group, indicating no difference in baseline ability (p = 0.824). The same trend was seen for post-test, where there was no significant difference in the percent accuracy of the LWS activity between groups (p = 0.385). However, the percent transfer score in the LWS was higher in the control group (33.33%) than the snowboarding group (7.25%). This would indicate that VR had a negative impact on LWS performance. Conclusions: VR training had negative impact on the balance of the participants in LWS task. This suggests that the participants adapted a different strategy for postural stability than is required for the LWS task. Therefore, future studies should investigate the impact of VR training on balance in detail.