Presentation Title

Prevalence of Scapular Dyskinesis in Surfers Compared to Non Surfers

Faculty Mentor

Deanna Asakawa, Jeff Nessler, Sean Newcomer

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:00 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

Location

195

Session

poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

health_nutrition_clinical_science

Abstract

Typical movement patterns of the scapula depend primarily on stability and support from the surrounding musculature through joint force coupling. When the symmetry of the muscular structures of the shoulder are disrupted due to an imbalance or overuse, it may lead to pain and/or dysfunction, known as scapular dyskinesis. Scapular dyskinesis is common in those who participate in overhead sports, but the prevalence among surfers is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of scapular dyskinesis amongst the surfing population. Methods: Scapular motion was observed in 24 participants during a series of 3 movements; scaption, shoulder flexion, and shoulder abduction. The participants were 13 male surfers, 1 adaptive male surfer, and 10 non-surfers comprised of 2 males and 8 females. Each participant self-reported information regarding height, weight, age, previous surfing experience, surfing competency, participation in other overhead sports, and previous injury in response to an IRB approved questionnaire. Shoulder motions were reviewed and interpreted by several researchers to determine evidence of scapular winging, tipping, and/or shrugging.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 23rd, 10:00 AM Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM

Prevalence of Scapular Dyskinesis in Surfers Compared to Non Surfers

195

Typical movement patterns of the scapula depend primarily on stability and support from the surrounding musculature through joint force coupling. When the symmetry of the muscular structures of the shoulder are disrupted due to an imbalance or overuse, it may lead to pain and/or dysfunction, known as scapular dyskinesis. Scapular dyskinesis is common in those who participate in overhead sports, but the prevalence among surfers is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of scapular dyskinesis amongst the surfing population. Methods: Scapular motion was observed in 24 participants during a series of 3 movements; scaption, shoulder flexion, and shoulder abduction. The participants were 13 male surfers, 1 adaptive male surfer, and 10 non-surfers comprised of 2 males and 8 females. Each participant self-reported information regarding height, weight, age, previous surfing experience, surfing competency, participation in other overhead sports, and previous injury in response to an IRB approved questionnaire. Shoulder motions were reviewed and interpreted by several researchers to determine evidence of scapular winging, tipping, and/or shrugging.