Presentation Title

The Use of Virtual Reality in Hand-Dexterity Training

Faculty Mentor

Tumay Tunur Dr.

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:00 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

Location

197

Session

poster 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

health_nutrition_clinical_science

Abstract

Introduction: Virtual reality (VR) has emerged as a new approach for rehabilitation and functional improvement for individuals with disabilities. Virtual environments provide controlled and highly replicable conditions for training in a task. Hand dexterity emphasis has amplified as it represents a hallmark of quality of life and cognitive function thus heightening necessities to cultivate efficient training. With hand dexterity task implementation, rehabilitation of independence can occur and reduce diminished quality of life. The purpose of this study was to investigate if VR-based hand dexterity training would be as effective as traditional training methods. For this, we compared a VR-based game, Katana X, to a conventional training method, cup stacking. Methods: Twenty four subjects from CSUSM were randomly assigned to VR training with Katana X or conventional training with cup stacking. After baseline testing with the Minnesota Dexterity Test, subjects completed four trials of training, with five minutes of rest in between. Finally, subjects were assessed for potential improvement in hand-dexterity by completing the Minnesota Dexterity Test. Results: Results (n = 24) revealed that there were no significant differences (p > 0.05) in the skill transfer of cup stacking (11.7% ± 9.4) and Katana X (8.7% ± 6.5) on hand-dexterity scores in the Minnesota Dexterity Test. Additionally, results determined that there is no significant difference in the hand-dexterity scores between the groups (p > 0.05). Conclusion: This study suggests that VR tasks are comparable to conventional methods in dexterity skill development. Future evolution of VR training may include physical object integration with an adjustable environment to diversify learning tasks. VR training regimes can be tailored to target specific motor function deficiencies in conjunction with other technology that tracks an individual’s movement to illustrate a more comprehensive technique of monitoring progression.

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Nov 23rd, 10:00 AM Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM

The Use of Virtual Reality in Hand-Dexterity Training

197

Introduction: Virtual reality (VR) has emerged as a new approach for rehabilitation and functional improvement for individuals with disabilities. Virtual environments provide controlled and highly replicable conditions for training in a task. Hand dexterity emphasis has amplified as it represents a hallmark of quality of life and cognitive function thus heightening necessities to cultivate efficient training. With hand dexterity task implementation, rehabilitation of independence can occur and reduce diminished quality of life. The purpose of this study was to investigate if VR-based hand dexterity training would be as effective as traditional training methods. For this, we compared a VR-based game, Katana X, to a conventional training method, cup stacking. Methods: Twenty four subjects from CSUSM were randomly assigned to VR training with Katana X or conventional training with cup stacking. After baseline testing with the Minnesota Dexterity Test, subjects completed four trials of training, with five minutes of rest in between. Finally, subjects were assessed for potential improvement in hand-dexterity by completing the Minnesota Dexterity Test. Results: Results (n = 24) revealed that there were no significant differences (p > 0.05) in the skill transfer of cup stacking (11.7% ± 9.4) and Katana X (8.7% ± 6.5) on hand-dexterity scores in the Minnesota Dexterity Test. Additionally, results determined that there is no significant difference in the hand-dexterity scores between the groups (p > 0.05). Conclusion: This study suggests that VR tasks are comparable to conventional methods in dexterity skill development. Future evolution of VR training may include physical object integration with an adjustable environment to diversify learning tasks. VR training regimes can be tailored to target specific motor function deficiencies in conjunction with other technology that tracks an individual’s movement to illustrate a more comprehensive technique of monitoring progression.