Presentation Title

Impact of Duration Spent in Restrictive vs. Free Movement Locations on Infants’ Achievement of Gross Motor Skills

Faculty Mentor

Do Kyeong Lee

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 11:30 AM

Location

2

Session

poster 4

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Infants achieve motor milestones, such as walking, at varying ages. The preliminary study found that socioeconomic status may impact infants’ walking onset time. However, the reasoning behind this onset and correlation has yet to be explained. The present study seeks to investigate early infant movement behaviors, in hopes of better understanding how they spend their time throughout the day. Specifically, the amount of time that infants spend in restrictive locations versus open ones will be observed. Restrictive locations may include being held by a caregiver or in a bouncing chair, when compared to open areas such as playing on the floor or in an open room. All infants will be observed through the completion of monthly home visits, where their play time is recorded for 20-30 minutes. As a naturalistic observation study, the researcher spends the visits recording the infants’ spontaneous movement but does not intervene with their natural activities. The infants will be observed at the age of three months old and again at the age of six months old. In total, there will be seven infants participating in the study and data will be collected for all, at both age ranges. Data coding will include frame by frame video review of each infant in free play. Thus allowing the frequency and duration to be calculated for both restrictive and free locations. From this data further correlations can be made about the impact of free and restrictive locations on the infants’ gross motor skills. Specifically, correlations between the achievement of certain milestones such as sitting, crawling, cruising and walking. It is expected that those infants spending more time in free movement locations will achieve these motor milestones sooner; in comparison to those infants that are spending less time in free movement locations and more time in restrictive movement locations.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM Nov 23rd, 11:30 AM

Impact of Duration Spent in Restrictive vs. Free Movement Locations on Infants’ Achievement of Gross Motor Skills

2

Infants achieve motor milestones, such as walking, at varying ages. The preliminary study found that socioeconomic status may impact infants’ walking onset time. However, the reasoning behind this onset and correlation has yet to be explained. The present study seeks to investigate early infant movement behaviors, in hopes of better understanding how they spend their time throughout the day. Specifically, the amount of time that infants spend in restrictive locations versus open ones will be observed. Restrictive locations may include being held by a caregiver or in a bouncing chair, when compared to open areas such as playing on the floor or in an open room. All infants will be observed through the completion of monthly home visits, where their play time is recorded for 20-30 minutes. As a naturalistic observation study, the researcher spends the visits recording the infants’ spontaneous movement but does not intervene with their natural activities. The infants will be observed at the age of three months old and again at the age of six months old. In total, there will be seven infants participating in the study and data will be collected for all, at both age ranges. Data coding will include frame by frame video review of each infant in free play. Thus allowing the frequency and duration to be calculated for both restrictive and free locations. From this data further correlations can be made about the impact of free and restrictive locations on the infants’ gross motor skills. Specifically, correlations between the achievement of certain milestones such as sitting, crawling, cruising and walking. It is expected that those infants spending more time in free movement locations will achieve these motor milestones sooner; in comparison to those infants that are spending less time in free movement locations and more time in restrictive movement locations.