Presentation Title

Impacts of Asian versus American Parenting Styles on Child Development

Faculty Mentor

Misty Kolchakian

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 11:30 AM

Location

20

Session

poster 4

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

In recent years, there has been much concern about which parenting styles benefit children the most. The purpose of this study is to examine the differences between Asian and American parenting styles with the goal of understanding their effects on child development. Specifically, this study will explore the cultural aspects of various parenting styles and their impacts on self-esteem and academic performance in children and college students. Newman (2015) explained that American parenting is more inclined towards an authoritative style which shows respect for children’s opinions and prioritizes reasoning, but eastern parenting in collectivist societies (e.g. China and Japan) is more about authority with an emphasis of interdependence. Historically, authoritarian parenting has been viewed less positively as compared to authoritative parenting. However, research studies on the effects of authoritarian parenting on self-esteem showed mixed results, depending on the country of origin (Otto, 2017; Kim, Peng, & Chiu, 2008; Dornbusch, 1987). For Asians, there was a positive relationship between authoritarian parenting and academic achievements, but authoritarian parenting and permissive parenting were associated with low grades among White individuals (Dornbusch, 1987). After reviewing past literature, it is clear that there is not a perfect parenting style because it depends largely on other social and cultural factors. For example, the use of inconsistent parenting styles between two parents could create anxiety among children and pose adverse effects on their school performance (Dornbusch, 1987). Therefore, it is important for parents to learn about the outcomes of different parenting styles and acknowledge the cultural variations in parenting styles. As the expectations on children and goals of parenting may vary in different cultures, parents should consider their cultural values when raising their children instead of relinquishing their cultural heritage in favor of the predominant parenting style.

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Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM Nov 23rd, 11:30 AM

Impacts of Asian versus American Parenting Styles on Child Development

20

In recent years, there has been much concern about which parenting styles benefit children the most. The purpose of this study is to examine the differences between Asian and American parenting styles with the goal of understanding their effects on child development. Specifically, this study will explore the cultural aspects of various parenting styles and their impacts on self-esteem and academic performance in children and college students. Newman (2015) explained that American parenting is more inclined towards an authoritative style which shows respect for children’s opinions and prioritizes reasoning, but eastern parenting in collectivist societies (e.g. China and Japan) is more about authority with an emphasis of interdependence. Historically, authoritarian parenting has been viewed less positively as compared to authoritative parenting. However, research studies on the effects of authoritarian parenting on self-esteem showed mixed results, depending on the country of origin (Otto, 2017; Kim, Peng, & Chiu, 2008; Dornbusch, 1987). For Asians, there was a positive relationship between authoritarian parenting and academic achievements, but authoritarian parenting and permissive parenting were associated with low grades among White individuals (Dornbusch, 1987). After reviewing past literature, it is clear that there is not a perfect parenting style because it depends largely on other social and cultural factors. For example, the use of inconsistent parenting styles between two parents could create anxiety among children and pose adverse effects on their school performance (Dornbusch, 1987). Therefore, it is important for parents to learn about the outcomes of different parenting styles and acknowledge the cultural variations in parenting styles. As the expectations on children and goals of parenting may vary in different cultures, parents should consider their cultural values when raising their children instead of relinquishing their cultural heritage in favor of the predominant parenting style.