Presentation Title

Geological Mapping, Geochemistry, and Geochronology of the Western Mojave Batholith

Faculty Mentor

Nicholas J. Van Buer

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 11:30 AM

Location

202

Session

poster 4

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

interdisciplinary

Abstract

Geological Mapping, Geochemistry, and Geochronology of the Western Mojave Batholith

By Vanessa Pena

Co- Author Dr. Nicholas Van Buer

About 100 million years ago the Mojave Desert looked similar to the modern Andes mountains today. It had active volcanoes erupting that drastically changed the landscape. These volcanoes had large magma chambers that cooled slowly over time creating the Mojave batholith that has been now exposed from erosion and weathering. For my research, I have studied the Western Mojave Batholith by mapping and collecting geochemistry data of one ~100km2 part of the batholith. I have collected rock samples in different locations of my map of the Mojave batholith to process each sample through the X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) to get a complete chemical analysis of these samples to see the gradual change in composition. From the samples I collected there three distinct rock units. These units are sphene bearing biotite hornblende quartz monzonite, columnar biotite granite, and hornblende biotite quartz monzonite. Using the data, I collected from the XRF I am able to see the distinct different compositions of each rock sample to be able to classify which unit they belong to which helping me locate contacts lines between two samples. Also collecting Geochronology data from age dating my rock samples using the laser-ablation-inductively-coupled-plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) and comparing my data with a previously collected ages by the use of the Sensitive High Resolution Ion Microprobe-Reverse Geometry (SHRIMP-RG) to see if they correlate. I aged dated two samples one from the columnar biotite granite which dated around 84 Ma ± 6Ma and the other was from the hornblende biotite quartz monzonite that aged around 85 Ma ± 10 Ma which correlate to the for the dated rock unit sphene bearing biotite hornblende quartz monzonite that was 84.6 Ma.

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Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM Nov 23rd, 11:30 AM

Geological Mapping, Geochemistry, and Geochronology of the Western Mojave Batholith

202

Geological Mapping, Geochemistry, and Geochronology of the Western Mojave Batholith

By Vanessa Pena

Co- Author Dr. Nicholas Van Buer

About 100 million years ago the Mojave Desert looked similar to the modern Andes mountains today. It had active volcanoes erupting that drastically changed the landscape. These volcanoes had large magma chambers that cooled slowly over time creating the Mojave batholith that has been now exposed from erosion and weathering. For my research, I have studied the Western Mojave Batholith by mapping and collecting geochemistry data of one ~100km2 part of the batholith. I have collected rock samples in different locations of my map of the Mojave batholith to process each sample through the X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) to get a complete chemical analysis of these samples to see the gradual change in composition. From the samples I collected there three distinct rock units. These units are sphene bearing biotite hornblende quartz monzonite, columnar biotite granite, and hornblende biotite quartz monzonite. Using the data, I collected from the XRF I am able to see the distinct different compositions of each rock sample to be able to classify which unit they belong to which helping me locate contacts lines between two samples. Also collecting Geochronology data from age dating my rock samples using the laser-ablation-inductively-coupled-plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) and comparing my data with a previously collected ages by the use of the Sensitive High Resolution Ion Microprobe-Reverse Geometry (SHRIMP-RG) to see if they correlate. I aged dated two samples one from the columnar biotite granite which dated around 84 Ma ± 6Ma and the other was from the hornblende biotite quartz monzonite that aged around 85 Ma ± 10 Ma which correlate to the for the dated rock unit sphene bearing biotite hornblende quartz monzonite that was 84.6 Ma.