Presentation Title

Examination of the effects of practice schedule on novel motor skill learning for the dominant and non-dominant hand

Faculty Mentor

Deanna Asakawa

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 11:30 AM

Location

206

Session

poster 4

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

interdisciplinary

Abstract

Motor skill learning has many important applications, including those related to practice of movement skills and motor skill rehabilitation (Latash 2008). As stated in Wolpert et al. (2001), the goal of motor learning is to improve motor skill performance. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of practice on motor learning by studying 2 groups with different practice schedules working to improve catching a ball into a cup on a wooden Kendama. Our hypothesis was that, based on practice schedules, Group 1 would have more catches on the dominant hand and Group 2 would have more catches on the non-dominant hand. We also expected that variability in skill completion as measured by the standard deviation (SD) of wrist acceleration during the throw of the ball would decrease for both groups as the amount of practice increased. It was also hypothesized that the number of ball catches for both groups would increase with practice. Methods: 18 healthy college-aged participants (age 24.3 ± 5.40 years, 7 males, 11 females) were split into two groups of nine participants. Over a 5 week period, both groups practiced the Kendama two times a week for a total of 10 minutes catching the Kendama ball into the small cup while standing. Group 1 practiced for five minutes each on the dominant hand and five minutes on the non-dominant hand two times per week. Group 2 practiced for two minutes on their dominant hand and eight minutes on their non-dominant hand two times per week. Movement data was collected using an accelerometer sensor attached to the wrist.

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Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM Nov 23rd, 11:30 AM

Examination of the effects of practice schedule on novel motor skill learning for the dominant and non-dominant hand

206

Motor skill learning has many important applications, including those related to practice of movement skills and motor skill rehabilitation (Latash 2008). As stated in Wolpert et al. (2001), the goal of motor learning is to improve motor skill performance. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of practice on motor learning by studying 2 groups with different practice schedules working to improve catching a ball into a cup on a wooden Kendama. Our hypothesis was that, based on practice schedules, Group 1 would have more catches on the dominant hand and Group 2 would have more catches on the non-dominant hand. We also expected that variability in skill completion as measured by the standard deviation (SD) of wrist acceleration during the throw of the ball would decrease for both groups as the amount of practice increased. It was also hypothesized that the number of ball catches for both groups would increase with practice. Methods: 18 healthy college-aged participants (age 24.3 ± 5.40 years, 7 males, 11 females) were split into two groups of nine participants. Over a 5 week period, both groups practiced the Kendama two times a week for a total of 10 minutes catching the Kendama ball into the small cup while standing. Group 1 practiced for five minutes each on the dominant hand and five minutes on the non-dominant hand two times per week. Group 2 practiced for two minutes on their dominant hand and eight minutes on their non-dominant hand two times per week. Movement data was collected using an accelerometer sensor attached to the wrist.