Presentation Title

Last Minute Studying For Finals? Flashcard Techniques and Effects on Memory

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Netta Schroer

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 11:30 AM

Location

24

Session

poster 4

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

The present study was conducted to investigate definition recall in college students using flashcards. The study used a 2 x 2 experimental design. 111 college students recruited from Palomar College and California State University San Marcos received sets of flashcards on a keyring and studied terms and definitions on the cards with a 3 minute time limit. The students were then given a test with a 2 minute time limit. Independent variables were the definition length (full or summarized), and color of flashcards (colored cards or white cards). To ensure construct validity, unusual and little-known terms were used, to prevent the confound of word familiarity prior to the test. Inconsistent with the hypotheses, there was no main effect of color, a main effect of definition length such that summarized definitions were recalled more often than full definitions, and no interaction between the independent variables. Implications and suggestions for future research are discussed.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM Nov 23rd, 11:30 AM

Last Minute Studying For Finals? Flashcard Techniques and Effects on Memory

24

The present study was conducted to investigate definition recall in college students using flashcards. The study used a 2 x 2 experimental design. 111 college students recruited from Palomar College and California State University San Marcos received sets of flashcards on a keyring and studied terms and definitions on the cards with a 3 minute time limit. The students were then given a test with a 2 minute time limit. Independent variables were the definition length (full or summarized), and color of flashcards (colored cards or white cards). To ensure construct validity, unusual and little-known terms were used, to prevent the confound of word familiarity prior to the test. Inconsistent with the hypotheses, there was no main effect of color, a main effect of definition length such that summarized definitions were recalled more often than full definitions, and no interaction between the independent variables. Implications and suggestions for future research are discussed.