Presentation Title

Functional Validation of New Manufactured Wafer in the CT-80DR+

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Stephen Tsui

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 11:30 AM

Location

246

Session

poster 4

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

physical_mathematical_sciences

Abstract

In airports across the United States, luggage is scanned, or x-rayed, using computer tomography machines. These machines are very similar to those you see in hospitals for performing chest scans to view internal organs without having to do invasive surgery. The TSA (Transportation Security Administration) created a standard that all baggage going on to an airplane must first be scanned through a CT (computer tomography or CAT) machine. During my internship at Leidos, I worked with the Science Team on their baggage detection system, call the CT-80DR+. In this industry, like all their competitors, these machines must be approved by the TSA through a FAT (Factory Acceptance Test) and a SAT (Site Acceptance Test) for each system that goes into production. Each of these tests use bags with unique structures about them used for testing, which we need to be able to arrive at specific calculated results, set by the TSA. Passing these structured bag tests at each site is critical for Leidos to uphold their end of the contract with the U.S. Government.

A major part of the computational process is detecting the weakened x-rays that hit the detector array after passing through luggage, the FAT bag, or SAT bag. These detectors wear out from thousands of hours of use and must be replaced with new wafers. Leidos originally purchased 4-inch (100 mm) diameter silicon wafers. Just prior to my internship, Leidos was notified they will no longer be able to obtain 4-inch wafers from their vendor, as they are obsolete, and instead, they will now be 6-inch (150 mm) diameter. This means new machines, as well as older machines with 4-inch wafers, will need to use the newer 6-inch wafers. General knowledge is that bigger silicon wafers improve the electronic functionality of the CT machines. Even though this should mean that we would have improved spatial resolution, Leidos would like to maintain the current image quality ensuring that no further in-depth documentation would be needed to be submitted to the TSA. As part of my internship, I was tasked to assist in understanding what changes, if any, better or worse, from the 4-inch to 6-inch wafer would be in the detector boards. Our test results indicated that the 6-inch wafer performance was on par if not slightly better than the 4-inch wafer standard.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM Nov 23rd, 11:30 AM

Functional Validation of New Manufactured Wafer in the CT-80DR+

246

In airports across the United States, luggage is scanned, or x-rayed, using computer tomography machines. These machines are very similar to those you see in hospitals for performing chest scans to view internal organs without having to do invasive surgery. The TSA (Transportation Security Administration) created a standard that all baggage going on to an airplane must first be scanned through a CT (computer tomography or CAT) machine. During my internship at Leidos, I worked with the Science Team on their baggage detection system, call the CT-80DR+. In this industry, like all their competitors, these machines must be approved by the TSA through a FAT (Factory Acceptance Test) and a SAT (Site Acceptance Test) for each system that goes into production. Each of these tests use bags with unique structures about them used for testing, which we need to be able to arrive at specific calculated results, set by the TSA. Passing these structured bag tests at each site is critical for Leidos to uphold their end of the contract with the U.S. Government.

A major part of the computational process is detecting the weakened x-rays that hit the detector array after passing through luggage, the FAT bag, or SAT bag. These detectors wear out from thousands of hours of use and must be replaced with new wafers. Leidos originally purchased 4-inch (100 mm) diameter silicon wafers. Just prior to my internship, Leidos was notified they will no longer be able to obtain 4-inch wafers from their vendor, as they are obsolete, and instead, they will now be 6-inch (150 mm) diameter. This means new machines, as well as older machines with 4-inch wafers, will need to use the newer 6-inch wafers. General knowledge is that bigger silicon wafers improve the electronic functionality of the CT machines. Even though this should mean that we would have improved spatial resolution, Leidos would like to maintain the current image quality ensuring that no further in-depth documentation would be needed to be submitted to the TSA. As part of my internship, I was tasked to assist in understanding what changes, if any, better or worse, from the 4-inch to 6-inch wafer would be in the detector boards. Our test results indicated that the 6-inch wafer performance was on par if not slightly better than the 4-inch wafer standard.