Presentation Title

Permanent Hybrid Quadrupoles for Time Resolved Electron Microscopy

Faculty Mentor

Pietro Musumeci

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 11:30 AM

Location

248

Session

poster 4

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

physical_mathematical_sciences

Abstract

Modern day electron microscopy faces several limitations: large size and cost, a limited time resolution of 10 ns, and a limited sample thickness of 70 nm. At UCLA’s particle beam physics laboratory, we are currently investing how a relativistic electron beam in combination with a set of special magnets called ”Hybrid Permanent Magnetic Quadrupoles” or (Hybrid PMQ’s) can achieve femto-second images at greater thickness with reduced cost and size. Permanent magnets are much smaller and cheaper than the large magnetic lenses used in regular electron microscopes. Additionally, relativistic electron beams penetrate deeper into materials, while improving the time resolution by eliminating electron-electron repulsion through time dilation. In previous experiments (with non-hybrid PMQ’s), we have reached pico-second images at a 30x resolution. Currently, we are designing a new set of magnets with an adjustable magnetic field to focus an image.

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Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM Nov 23rd, 11:30 AM

Permanent Hybrid Quadrupoles for Time Resolved Electron Microscopy

248

Modern day electron microscopy faces several limitations: large size and cost, a limited time resolution of 10 ns, and a limited sample thickness of 70 nm. At UCLA’s particle beam physics laboratory, we are currently investing how a relativistic electron beam in combination with a set of special magnets called ”Hybrid Permanent Magnetic Quadrupoles” or (Hybrid PMQ’s) can achieve femto-second images at greater thickness with reduced cost and size. Permanent magnets are much smaller and cheaper than the large magnetic lenses used in regular electron microscopes. Additionally, relativistic electron beams penetrate deeper into materials, while improving the time resolution by eliminating electron-electron repulsion through time dilation. In previous experiments (with non-hybrid PMQ’s), we have reached pico-second images at a 30x resolution. Currently, we are designing a new set of magnets with an adjustable magnetic field to focus an image.